Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I am new to goldens, and never showen a dog befor or even know the reasons for doing it.

what benifit does conformation give you, or is it just bragging rights if you are not going to bread your dog?

Also can they be nutered or do they have to be unaltered?

they reason I ask is about 5 people have asked me if I was going to show as they figure my little boy would do very well.

thanks
Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,537 Posts
I have someone show my young golden for me; I have shown my older goldens (now at the Bridge) in Veterans. The value in showing in conformation is that you have a judge review your golden's structure, gait, bite and to some degree, temperament, and judge it according to the Golden Retriever standard. Depending on the day, the judge and your dog, if your dog is considered the best representative of the breed, your Golden could win Best of Breed, Winners Dog (as best representative among all dogs entered) or Best of Winners (as best representative among both dogs and bitches entered) or win first in his class.

IMHO, I would look at who is giving you advice as to your golden's potential success in the show ring. Are these your neighbors? People at the dog park? Not that these people are not knowledgeable, but well, I would not trust them to give me the best advice regarding the breed standard and how my golden measures up. With our first golden, sold to us as a "pet," we received lots of comments about showing him--but it was always from people in the streets, or breeders who didn't show their dogs, or vets who didn't deal with show breeders. When we joined the local golden breed club, several members who showed regularly put their hands on him and, although complimented us on how handsome he was, felt he had slim prospects in the show ring. And when the breeder saw him again at aged 2, she agreed with her original assessment.

Now, if you have show breeders, breeders who have won Best of Breed, Sporting Group, serious hobby breeders who say that your golden has potential, then run, don't walk, to the nearest conformation class and start working your dog and if you don't want to handle him ask around for recommendations on a handler.

As to "bragging rights?" True hobby breeders are looking to see how their breeding program compares to the standard--I wouldn't call it "bragging" per se because breeders know that judges have certain likes/dislikes and styles that they prefer. The novices, IMHO, can tend to see it as "bragging rights" but so much goes into giving a good performance the day of a show that it really is a team effort between dog and handler, with the handler knowing how to show off the dog's good points. Hope this is of help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi, thanks, by bragging rights I ment that for myself who doesn't intend on breeding. I know it would benifit the breeders as it would be one more for there resumee, but I was basicly wondering what the benifit would be to own a family pet that has gone through the rings.

the breeder I got it from has showen several dogs and from what I saw on there wall had good sucess. They mentions that he would mostlikely get his confermation very quickly. I don't understand how they know cuz all the puppys look the same to me :)

a few of the people who said I should show him have showen goldens themselves, so there might be some knowlage in there sugestions.

So if you show them, what age do you start at? and is it an expensive process or not bad?

and is there any resorses on here I can read that will explain the process and what is required on my end.

thanks
Steve
 

·
chew chew chew
Joined
·
3,571 Posts
Hi there,

Don't assume getting a CH on your dog will mean instant studmuffin. Many dogs finish their CH and then are neutered. But, it does mean you have a nice looking golden who conforms to the breed standard, and you get pictures to hang up of your show dog...

If you want to do it yourself it's a learning process and a lot of work, many owners opt to send them off with a handler or the breeder to do conformation (I do, it's not my fave thing to do with the dogs). Even that is great for your dog, he gets exposed to different places, people and noises, gets rewarded in the ring for behaving himself (or bribed) and so on.

It can cost a lot depending on where you are and how you do it too, and it means you have to do things like NEVER leave a collar on him (it damages the coat and leaves a ring around the neckt that is almost impossible to repair) for longer than needed, keeping his coat in good shape and combed out and going to whoever the breeder/handler suggests for grooming (see the post about the grooming nightmare), keeping him at a good weight and condition and doing some basic training at home.

The best place to start would be to contact the breeder and ask if they know of any local handling classes you can go to with your pup, and what they suggest. Different lines and dogs do better at different ages too so it can take a few years (Bender didn't get much for points at all as a youngster, however she went to a show as a 2-3 year old and finished with group placements in one weekend).

Good luck and keep us posted, we do require pictures of all puppies on this board. :)

Lana
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,537 Posts
I think the place to start is with your breeder, and have a heart to heart talk and say you are serious, and see if your breeder was serious, or just making small talk. I have a friend who purchased a golden from a top hobby breeder and she told me she got pick bitch, and said that the contract stated she would have to spay her pup shortly after 6 months of age (well, I scratched my head about that one). After my long pause, my friend then said that she felt if she really got pick bitch, the breeder would not have wanted the pup spayed. . .BINGO!!!! So see if the breeder was serious.

My second golden was sold to me as a show prospect. She was shown at matches and evaluated by the breeder and co-breeder to determine when she was ready to be shown. No better person than the breeder would be the one to give the thumbs up that the time is right, and give you direction regarding the maturity of the line. My breeder also wanted me to get her hips, eyes, elbows and heart done after she turned two, because if I was going to put money into her and show her, she wanted to know her full potential not only as she met the standard, but also health-wise.

My second golden never became a CH--she took too much after her mother, who preferred eating doggie bon bons on the couch versus posing for bait in the show ring (although her mother became a CH). But I loved her all the same, and did some things with her with therapy dog work, and rally, and canine good citizenship.

My third golden, by all accounts, will probably not mature until she is closer to 3. Fortunately, her handler is close by and I'm able to take her to conformation classes and work with her handler regarding training and conditioning and coat care. Her breeder also is close by to review her progress and give me advice. If you can get a network close by of people you trust, that's great.

Lots of people make offhand remarks, and I have found that some breeders feel they breed a litter of six, and that 5 are potential Champions, but that is not the case--in the normal litter, a breeder is thrilled if one golden becomes a CH. I would see how serious your breeder is--to me, if the breeder was serious, they would tell you what they think makes your dog special--the shoulder layback? the balance? the way he covers ground? (reach and drive?) Just a general "I think your dog would do well in the show ring" just wouldn't cut it for me--I would need to know more--and why--to make sure that the person telling me this was serious, and not just making idle talk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,776 Posts
Hi and welcome to the forum and the fabulous world of Goldens!!!
I was just curious - when you bought your puppy, was there any restrictions in his contract?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi and welcome to the forum and the fabulous world of Goldens!!!
I was just curious - when you bought your puppy, was there any restrictions in his contract?
ya it was sold as a "pet" standard contract. so spay/neuter and penilties for breading him with out there permission and aproval.
which kind of confuses me, why say he has to be spay/neutered at 6months, then tell me to put it off as long as I can so he will develop properly, then say I can't breed him with out there permision/aproval if he should be nutered anyways? haha

I posted some pics in the pic section
http://www.goldenretrieverforum.com/showthread.php?t=71878

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I think the place to start is with your breeder, and have a heart to heart talk and say you are serious, and see if your breeder was serious, or just making small talk. I have a friend who purchased a golden from a top hobby breeder and she told me she got pick bitch, and said that the contract stated she would have to spay her pup shortly after 6 months of age (well, I scratched my head about that one). After my long pause, my friend then said that she felt if she really got pick bitch, the breeder would not have wanted the pup spayed. . .BINGO!!!! So see if the breeder was serious.
I'll have to have a talk with him again. he was asking if I was going to show him last time we talked.. guess I should find out why he was asking.

Steve
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top