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Sandy's People
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5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our usually easy to train, sweet little 2 year old Golden has started having barking frenzies. They start when she either hears other dogs in the neighborhood barking or sees someone walking (we live in relatively secluded area). Once she gets in her frenzy, she won't stop, won't come, and she is loud! She seems to loose all of here training in the heat of the moment. I'm afraid she'll scare the neighbors, even though I know she wouldn't hurt a fly.

We've tried to be consistent with using "quit" and rewarding her behavior. But in her frenzy this won't work. We've tried the citronella bark collar and it worked for a while, but now in the frenzy she doesn't care if she gets sprayed (or maybe her hair is getting in the way?)

Anyway, help! Does anyone have any insight or ideas?
 

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I miss my Buddy
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11,534 Posts
Just to welcome you on the forum. There are people here who could help, hope they see your post.
 

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3,957 Posts
Barking frenzies usually have underlying stressors either over excitement or feeling threatened, or frustration. Living in a relatively secluded area, she rarely sees strangers go by - so could well feel threatened by them - of course - barking 'makes' them go away. Barking with/at the other dogs could be excitement or warning them to stay away - is her tail up or tucked?
Prevention - don't leave her outside to practice, go out with her, put her on a longline, so you have a some physical control if you need it, reward her for being quiet, practice building a solid recall and using very high value rewards (reserved just for recall). If she starts barking, don't yell (bark with her) interupt with a whistle or squeaky toy before she gets 'wound' up, call her back to you and reward. If she is already full force, use the long line to gently (don't yank) redirect her towards you, distract her with some smelly treats, feed the treats as you lead her back to the house. I have barkers, going out with them or not leaving them outside on their own for very long, and immediately calling them to me, before or if they do start barking, minimizes the occurrences.
 

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Sandy's People
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Oh thank you! Her tale is up and even wagging while she barks. I needed your calm reminder to keep working with her. Today, she is responding much better and I am being more patient. I have the long lead out and left over steak (yum). She is defiantly a high energy girl and did not get as much exercise during our cold snap. I think it's true, a tired dog is a good dog!
 

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AKA: Joyce
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7,442 Posts
Hi, welcome to the forum! Yes, a tired dog is a good dog. Also stay outside with her so you can correct the barking as it happens. I've had some dogs that were pretty tough to break the barking but consistency always pays off. Sometimes it helps to find a sharp or annoying quick noise to make that will instantly get her attention. Good luck ♥
 

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Nancy
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7,493 Posts
Hank likes to stand outside in the back and bark at...frogs?, lights in the distance?, fireflies?, birds?, nothing?. We've never figured it out. He started that about a year ago. He's not bored or stuck out there alone, he drives us nuts until we let him out. We ended up buying one of those bark inhibiter boxes. It looks like a birdhouse. It works pretty well but the batteries need to be changed every couple of days. Our backyard is wooded, so getting to the box isn't easy. Telling him to 'hush' doesn't work so I make him come back in.
 

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Sandy's People
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes, sometimes Sandy just stands out and barks at some unseen something also. The barking frenzies have been better the last few days as we're getting her out exercising more and staying out with her. Also, calmly talking to her when she starts ramp-ping up, looking at what she's barking at, thanking her for alerting us and then telling her "quite". I know, sounds crazy, but she IS trying to alert us, so I appreciate that as long as she understands to stop after we're alerted, right?
 

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As long as she understands when to 'quiet', make sure you reward her for being quiet tho, that is what you need/want.
 
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