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I fear we must be a terrible disappointment to our breeder, though she has been very kind all along. If she is disappointed, she doesn’t say so. My girl’s littermates across the country are already making great strides in dock diving and field work. But we live in a city. Just to get her to swim we had to drive to a swimming pool club for dogs in another city. I am going to stick with agility (chemo allowing), but I am not worthy of my dog. It seems the high aptitude is all on her part and none on mine. Please, breeders, be forgiving of people like me. I don’t know how far we will ever get, but I am doing my best.
I battle these feelings a lot with Lana. I had/have high goals and we've accomplished nothing in almost three years. I remember asking my breeder if I disappointed her or if she was disappointed that I haven't acheived my goals already. And she has reassured me that she understands and that goals can change and that she has never been disappointed and I should stop thinking like that. FWIW it doesn't stop the thinking but that's a me problem and not a her problem. Intrusive thoughts are intrusive. So I want to reassure you that you ARE worthy of your dog and I'm sure your breeder is proud of you and your relationship with your girl and what you've managed to do. Because you're right, you are doing your best and our best is all we can be asked for. :) Ya know? Sometimes our best doesn't look like the best of someone else and that's ok. If it's our best than that is all we can be asked for. hugs

W/R to field/performance bred goldens - I've only seen one that I'd categorize as out of control. And I think part of the issue was a miscommunication issue between him and his owner (who was older and has since past away). That owner was pretty loud and rough handling with the dog - and I think to a certain extent you had high energy + anxiety with that dog. He worked extra hard trying to be right - which meant he could be pretty frenzied when worked up.
I am loud and I have anxiety and 100% it feeds down the leash to all my dogs and makes them more wild then they would normally be. I acknowledge that but I don't really know how to fight it. When I've worked on fighting it, I've just been reprimanded by our trainers. I literally have to stand, stock still, barely breathing, no eye contact, and enter a semi-meditative state for the anxiety to not travel down the leash. If you know of any resources that'll help me alter my training I would love the recommendations. Because I can't train if I can't move and so far no one has been able to explain a better method for how I can circumvent or even just vent the energy either from myself or my dogs. When we are having an on day, Lana flies like a charm at the end of the leash but those off days crush my heart (cause I know it's me).
 

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I am loud and I have anxiety and 100% it feeds down the leash to all my dogs and makes them more wild then they would normally be. I acknowledge that but I don't really know how to fight it. When I've worked on fighting it, I've just been reprimanded by our trainers. I literally have to stand, stock still, barely breathing, no eye contact, and enter a semi-meditative state for the anxiety to not travel down the leash. If you know of any resources that'll help me alter my training I would love the recommendations. Because I can't train if I can't move and so far no one has been able to explain a better method for how I can circumvent or even just vent the energy either from myself or my dogs. When we are having an on day, Lana flies like a charm at the end of the leash but those off days crush my heart (cause I know it's me).
I'm not sure.... :(

I do know that when you are training dogs in obedience and feel like a spotlight is on you - people get nervous or rattled sometimes. And that nervousness goes down the leash to the dogs. Or the dogs sense it whether there is a leash or not.

It takes time working through all that... and getting past the cause of the anxiety.

Sometimes its your personality... and the dog you work with actually helps you. When your dog can be relied on to know his/her job, it can be calming? You get there through persisting with training and putting time in.

IF the anxiety is completely separate from the dog training.... I wish I had the answer. :( One of my brothers has anxiety issues and that is still a work in progress as far as helping him deal with the anxiety.
 

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I am loud and I have anxiety and 100% it feeds down the leash to all my dogs and makes them more wild then they would normally be. I acknowledge that but I don't really know how to fight it. When I've worked on fighting it, I've just been reprimanded by our trainers. I literally have to stand, stock still, barely breathing, no eye contact, and enter a semi-meditative state for the anxiety to not travel down the leash.
I sympathise. I’m anxious and I’ve struggled with social phobias for most of my life. Here are some of the things that have worked for me, particularly in relation to dog sports competitions.
I avoid unsupportive people. I was fortunate to have supportive family and mentors when I first started competing, in my teens. Even now, I would prefer to train by myself than in clubs with critical, dogmatic instructors. (In my experience, critical and dogmatic instructors often have less experience and history of success than they claim.) I prefer to compete under judges who make me feel relaxed, even if they’re hard scorers. This is for my dog’s benefit, as well as my own. As pack animals, dogs are very aware of their social environment, and may be stressed when someone speaks to their handler in an unfriendly voice.
I don’t let myself dwell on my failures and embarrassing moments. If I find myself doing so, I imagine opening a garbage bin, putting the memory inside and firmly closing the lid.
I visualise success. In quiet moments, I visualise myself walking into the ring and calmly working through the exercises. I run through relaxation exercises, so that I know how to relax myself before I go into the ring.
I practice footwork without my dog, sometimes even when I’m walking down my street. I’m clumsy, and I want to be able to focus on my dog, not my footwork.
I ask my husband to put me through practice runs, so that I can practice footwork with someone else calling the commands and halts.
In the ring, I try to walk tall but relax my shoulders. I believe that walking tall (straight backed and straight legged) conveys authority to my dog, and but tense shoulders convey tension, which travels down the leash. Tense shoulders also interfere with breathing, and steady breathing is important both for my wellbeing and for communication with my dog. I try to move smoothly and keep moving, focusing on the moment. When I’m fortunate, I get into a state of “flow”, where I totally absorbed in what I’m doing.
 

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I always get stricken by guilt when I read these threads. Until our current girl, we had golden mixes as pet dogs. This time, as retired empty nesters, I wanted a girl I could try learning with in all sorts of performance areas: rally, agility, obedience, who knows. And then pursue whatever my golden and I showed aptitude for. And a generous performance breeder gave me a chance.

Six weeks after we brought Vala home, Covid lockdown happened. Up till then I had been doing everything I could to get her properly socialized with dogs and humans. And some intro to agility as well as obedience private lessons. After lockdown, the best I could do was zoom obedience classes. And I worked at home on getting her a trick dog novice title. Since June, we’ve been doing cancer (mine) and covid lockdown simultaneously. This week, finally, for the first time, we started intro to agility class.

I fear we must be a terrible disappointment to our breeder, though she has been very kind all along. If she is disappointed, she doesn’t say so. My girl’s littermates across the country are already making great strides in dock diving and field work. But we live in a city. Just to get her to swim we had to drive to a swimming pool club for dogs in another city. I am going to stick with agility (chemo allowing), but I am not worthy of my dog. It seems the high aptitude is all on her part and none on mine. Please, breeders, be forgiving of people like me. I don’t know how far we will ever get, but I am doing my best.
My goodness. There was a pandemic and you have cancer. Please don't be so hard on yourself. I'm sure your breeder is happy you care and are doing your best with your dog. I bet your dog thinks you are worthy of her and loves you very much.

Our timing is similar with when we got our dogs. I just keep working with mine and having fun with him. He's happy, busy, and smart. Just keep working with yours as best you can, take care of yourself, and things will work out the way they should. I bet Vala is right where she should be taking care of you.
 

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As a past member to your last “ thread” your all about yourself! Nice car, nice home, all certifications hung on the wall! Get to REAL life! One day all your materialistic items will come to end! It doesn’t surprise me your SN is SoCal. All live in fantasy land! Yes it’s great to be able to send someone else to do the hard work to find a 100% certified animal! Unfortunately I was one of the “civil servants” putting out the fires .
No we don’t make the money you must make. Yes I’m disabled after my neck was snapped which resulted in a unsuccessful C-5 through C-7 . Am I angry? Not at all as it saved a young mans life. Do I honestly care that my pup didn’t come with all the certifications yours did? No I’m not! A family still has their father and husband!
Sir,you’ve got a lot to learn about real people! Seems you’ve lost your direction. In ending, I’ve got a wife of 43 years, a modest home “ paid for” and friends that care about me and not money!..Hang that on your wall!......David
Ummm... You might want to rethink this post. You got him all wrong.
 

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Ummm... You might want to rethink this post. You got him all wrong.
Dana, I have given him a heartfelt apology. I was and am wrong. Not making excuses but after spending the day Mowing my yard and then a couple bud lites, I was wrong all together. SoCal is probably a very nice person and all I can say is I’m wrong and apologize.....David
 

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If this is the case, how do the top handlers/trainers repeatedly getting very high-performing dogs? Are they getting them later?
I’d say they are probably great trainers that can get the most out of any pup from a well bred litter. Obviously showing in the breed ring successfully or going for a FC or AFC might be a different issue.
 

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And then of course, there are the pups that are not perfect. Who wants them? I do. We have always rescued our dogs from situations where they were misunderstood and sometimes abused, brought them home, let them know they are safe and we are gently in charge so they do not feel they have to be. Currently fostered and now adopted an aggressive little 3 year old female whose one front paw was severely malformed since birth - set up baby gates everywhere and rotated the areas where she and our young golden male spent their indoor time. They chewed the same bones, played with the same toys, and slept on the same couch in rotation. No opportunity to hoard or be aggressive. They are now best buddies and enjoying our farm together off leash...Just one more miracle we have witnessed. I suppose some breeders would have seen that awful paw and euthenized her. I am so glad they did not. She is the companion and heart dog I have been waiting for all my life. Trying not to cry as I write this. Years ago we also were given a pup that was only 3 1/2 weeks old and the runt of the litter and not expected to live unless we took him in. The breeder had to have a serious operation and could not care for him. We had 12 years of bouncing fun with that one. So, my heart says that there is a place for every pup in the litter, and I trust that the breeders will know who belongs where. There is such a responsibility in raising and placing your pups in the best situation for each one. Keep up the good work!
God bless,
Wendy
 

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As someone who is primarily interested in performance, I don't really worry about first or last pick. There is no way to judge a performance prospect at 8 weeks. You cannot tell whether they will have good eyesight, a good memory, biddability, intelligence, etc. My current golden boy was a "leftover". I waffled so long on whether I wanted a pup, all the pups got claimed. Then someone backed out, the breeder asked if I was still interested, and I said yes. He has turned out to be the best dog I've ever owned.

Pinyon recently sired a litter and the stud fee is first pick boy. We will do an ichthyosis test prior to identify carriers and clears, but honestly, I'll probably just pick whatever puppy appeals to me most on the day I pick. I don't put much store in puppy testing. It's a lot of luck. The performance world has plenty of "last pick" stories of dogs that went on to be spectacular.

I am attracted to this little guy because of his cute little white forehead "kiss".
View attachment 882623
Your boy’s got a nice pedigree. Can I ask who the mother of the litter is? Just curious, I love to look at working pedigrees. The breeder of my current pup, says most of her litters you could just reach in and grab one, very consistent litters. She breeds Field Goldens, she let me pick my puppy, boy was that hard! Three girls to choose from, they were all great. In the end I took the one that picked me. My regular breeder always picked for me and did a great job.
 

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This is the breeding:

I went up to see the puppies in person for the first time yesterday. There are 4 boys and 5 girls in the litter. I concluded my favorite boy was whichever one I happened to be holding at the time. Impossible to decide! I am half-tempted to let the other three buyers who want a boy take their picks first. This is a video of 3 of the boys. (One had wandered off to nap.) When the whole litter is running around, it's a furry convention of cute.


(Not an litter advertisement; all puppies are sold.)
 

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This is the breeding:

I went up to see the puppies in person for the first time yesterday. There are 4 boys and 5 girls in the litter. I concluded my favorite boy was whichever one I happened to be holding at the time. Impossible to decide! I am half-tempted to let the other three buyers who want a boy take their picks first. This is a video of 3 of the boys. (One had wandered off to nap.) When the whole litter is running around, it's a furry convention of cute.


(Not an litter advertisement; all puppies are sold.)
Precious! This made me smile. I felt the same way when my breeder (Robin) was sending me photos and videos of puppies from Logan’s litter. There was certainly not a bad choice to be had. I ended up with the perfect pup for us. Congratulations on your new puppy to be.
 

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A bit of housekeeping...
  • First, I know that this could be a contentious topic between hobby/preservation breeders and non-hobbyists "just looking for a family companion". So, I'd ask everyone to "just chill".
  • Second, it's possible that this could/should be in the "puppy" section of the forum. However, I see this much more as a general discussion on attitudes and biases (using "bias" in a non-judgmental manner).
With that said...
  • If you are a hobby/preservation breeder reviewing applicants for a litter, do you consider intentions of the applicant as a screening/ranking factor?
  • If you are a hobbyist looking for a new puppy, what is your reaction to getting a puppy other-than-the-top-2-or-3?
  • If you are a "golden enthusiast" (my euphemism for someone who loves the breed, but lacks the commitment to be a hobbyist), how do you feel about getting puppies other-than-the-top-2-or-3? Or, perhaps, being skipped over altogether because of a lack of intent with-respect-to showing/competing in breed events?
As a self-identified "golden enthusiast" (vice "hobbyist"), I am fairly open about my intentions (i.e., family pet, will be well cared for, no intentions to breed, no intentions to show, no intentions to participate in field/other competitions). Given that, I can well understand that a hobby/preservation breeder may not want to place any of their litter in my household, much less those that are believed to have strong potential.

No problem. But, I cannot help but think "not every dog is going to be 'competition material', irrespective of the specific competition". Especially given the scarcity of well-bred litters, how does all this factor into who gets onto a breeder's "short list"? Frankly, given my (admittedly sparse) exposure to the hobbyist community, it would not surprise me if the first 2-to-3 puppies of any litter are already spoken for (i.e., promised to the owner of the dam, sire, and/or one-or-more persons with a personal relationship with the owners of the dam/sire). And, again, I have no issues with this arrangement (assuming it occurs). It's disappointing, at a personal level, as it makes obtaining a well-bred golden more difficult for folks like me. But, perfectly understandable when viewed from the hobbyists' perspective.

On a, hopefully, constructive note, where should enthusiasts-like-me focus our efforts on finding a well-bred golden. Of course, this assumes that "enthusiasts" are a bit disadvantaged with-respect-to placement on a hobby/preservation breeder's short list (and, I'd be quite happy to find out this is not the case), but I prefer to know what I'm dealing with. Frankly, had I known more about what I was potentially facing before starting our search, I may have looked into a different breed.
 

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A bit of housekeeping...
  • First, I know that this could be a contentious topic between hobby/preservation breeders and non-hobbyists "just looking for a family companion". So, I'd ask everyone to "just chill".
  • Second, it's possible that this could/should be in the "puppy" section of the forum. However, I see this much more as a general discussion on attitudes and biases (using "bias" in a non-judgmental manner).
With that said...
  • If you are a hobby/preservation breeder reviewing applicants for a litter, do you consider intentions of the applicant as a screening/ranking factor?
  • If you are a hobbyist looking for a new puppy, what is your reaction to getting a puppy other-than-the-top-2-or-3?
  • If you are a "golden enthusiast" (my euphemism for someone who loves the breed, but lacks the commitment to be a hobbyist), how do you feel about getting puppies other-than-the-top-2-or-3? Or, perhaps, being skipped over altogether because of a lack of intent with-respect-to showing/competing in breed events?
As a self-identified "golden enthusiast" (vice "hobbyist"), I am fairly open about my intentions (i.e., family pet, will be well cared for, no intentions to breed, no intentions to show, no intentions to participate in field/other competitions). Given that, I can well understand that a hobby/preservation breeder may not want to place any of their litter in my household, much less those that are believed to have strong potential.

No problem. But, I cannot help but think "not every dog is going to be 'competition material', irrespective of the specific competition". Especially given the scarcity of well-bred litters, how does all this factor into who gets onto a breeder's "short list"? Frankly, given my (admittedly sparse) exposure to the hobbyist community, it would not surprise me if the first 2-to-3 puppies of any litter are already spoken for (i.e., promised to the owner of the dam, sire, and/or one-or-more persons with a personal relationship with the owners of the dam/sire). And, again, I have no issues with this arrangement (assuming it occurs). It's disappointing, at a personal level, as it makes obtaining a well-bred golden more difficult for folks like me. But, perfectly understandable when viewed from the hobbyists' perspective.

On a, hopefully, constructive note, where should enthusiasts-like-me focus our efforts on finding a well-bred golden. Of course, this assumes that "enthusiasts" are a bit disadvantaged with-respect-to placement on a hobby/preservation breeder's short list (and, I'd be quite happy to find out this is not the case), but I prefer to know what I'm dealing with. Frankly, had I known more about what I was potentially facing before starting our search, I may have looked into a different breed.
99% of all my puppies go to pet homes and thus are bred to be the very best healthy family pet. Most breeders show their own dogs so there is not a great market for show homes. If there is someone in my club that I know will give my puppy a wonderful home with all the qualifications I require, and they want to show it, then they are put on the top of the list. I have found very often that many of the dogs that I thought were pets, could have been champions....but who cares. As long as they are loved like a part of the family, that is all I dream of for these precious puppies. I do not want my puppy to live on a truck traveling from show to show for years.
 

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My girl was bought for and meant to be a companion for a middle aged woman with a bad leg who needed a dog in her life again to bring up her spirits. I had lost my old girl at close to 15, 4 months prior. I needed a dog to pull me out of my rut, to care for and to be my "baby". The breeder we used had actually picked a male for me but with no deposit placed, that one went to a different home because I decided to wait until they had their second set of shots and it was a first come first serve. He told me the one he picked would have been perfect for me but had 3 others to look at.
We went to look and Molly followed me wherever I went and would sit by my feet. Her brother and sister ignored my husband and I and played with eachother. Molly was interested in us.
We took her home that night. She was smaller and after leaving the only home she had she developed a submissive piddle (has improved drastically) however the breeder, now known as a byb knew she would have quality food, vet care and we would probably spend too much money on toys. Her father is a champion agility competitor and he knew Molly would only get regular walks. He knew she would be loved to pieces and she is.
I think we make great pet owners as she has everything she could ever need (gets a fence i swore she would not get her this Saturday) lol
 

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This is the breeding:

I went up to see the puppies in person for the first time yesterday. There are 4 boys and 5 girls in the litter. I concluded my favorite boy was whichever one I happened to be holding at the time. Impossible to decide! I am half-tempted to let the other three buyers who want a boy take their picks first. This is a video of 3 of the boys. (One had wandered off to nap.) When the whole litter is running around, it's a furry convention of cute.


(Not an litter advertisement; all puppies are sold.)
What a nice litter! My current youngster is Firemark/Emberain girl. Three girls in the litter and almost impossible to pick one, I ended up letting her pick me.
 

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A bit of housekeeping...
  • First, I know that this could be a contentious topic between hobby/preservation breeders and non-hobbyists "just looking for a family companion". So, I'd ask everyone to "just chill".
  • Second, it's possible that this could/should be in the "puppy" section of the forum. However, I see this much more as a general discussion on attitudes and biases (using "bias" in a non-judgmental manner).
With that said...
  • If you are a hobby/preservation breeder reviewing applicants for a litter, do you consider intentions of the applicant as a screening/ranking factor?
  • If you are a hobbyist looking for a new puppy, what is your reaction to getting a puppy other-than-the-top-2-or-3?
  • If you are a "golden enthusiast" (my euphemism for someone who loves the breed, but lacks the commitment to be a hobbyist), how do you feel about getting puppies other-than-the-top-2-or-3? Or, perhaps, being skipped over altogether because of a lack of intent with-respect-to showing/competing in breed events?
As a self-identified "golden enthusiast" (vice "hobbyist"), I am fairly open about my intentions (i.e., family pet, will be well cared for, no intentions to breed, no intentions to show, no intentions to participate in field/other competitions). Given that, I can well understand that a hobby/preservation breeder may not want to place any of their litter in my household, much less those that are believed to have strong potential.

No problem. But, I cannot help but think "not every dog is going to be 'competition material', irrespective of the specific competition". Especially given the scarcity of well-bred litters, how does all this factor into who gets onto a breeder's "short list"? Frankly, given my (admittedly sparse) exposure to the hobbyist community, it would not surprise me if the first 2-to-3 puppies of any litter are already spoken for (i.e., promised to the owner of the dam, sire, and/or one-or-more persons with a personal relationship with the owners of the dam/sire). And, again, I have no issues with this arrangement (assuming it occurs). It's disappointing, at a personal level, as it makes obtaining a well-bred golden more difficult for folks like me. But, perfectly understandable when viewed from the hobbyists' perspective.

On a, hopefully, constructive note, where should enthusiasts-like-me focus our efforts on finding a well-bred golden. Of course, this assumes that "enthusiasts" are a bit disadvantaged with-respect-to placement on a hobby/preservation breeder's short list (and, I'd be quite happy to find out this is not the case), but I prefer to know what I'm dealing with. Frankly, had I known more about what I was potentially facing before starting our search, I may have looked into a different breed.
After reading SoCal complete thread, His thread is spot on. “True Breeders” are or should be trying to keeping the breed 100% as well to improve the health of this breed as the life expectancy is shortening.
Whether one chooses to show, compete, or just be a family member is a personal decision. I’ve never been involved with shows or competition as my past 2 GR were family members. I know the majority of people hate regulations but if all breeders were registered, I believe the health and life expectancy would also improve. It would also stop puppy mills! We all who went out a got a “ purebred” versus animal rescue sometimes hear the flak but when getting a pound animal you have no clue of what temperament or health issues your getting into. I have younger grandchildren and know that 99% of GR have a great temperament around kids. Yes the cost is worth it! My hat goes off to the true breeders!
 

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I battle these feelings a lot with Lana. I had/have high goals and we've accomplished nothing in almost three years. I remember asking my breeder if I disappointed her or if she was disappointed that I haven't acheived my goals already. And she has reassured me that she understands and that goals can change and that she has never been disappointed and I should stop thinking like that. FWIW it doesn't stop the thinking but that's a me problem and not a her problem. Intrusive thoughts are intrusive. So I want to reassure you that you ARE worthy of your dog and I'm sure your breeder is proud of you and your relationship with your girl and what you've managed to do. Because you're right, you are doing your best and our best is all we can be asked for. :) Ya know? Sometimes our best doesn't look like the best of someone else and that's ok. If it's our best than that is all we can be asked for. hugs


I am loud and I have anxiety and 100% it feeds down the leash to all my dogs and makes them more wild then they would normally be. I acknowledge that but I don't really know how to fight it. When I've worked on fighting it, I've just been reprimanded by our trainers. I literally have to stand, stock still, barely breathing, no eye contact, and enter a semi-meditative state for the anxiety to not travel down the leash. If you know of any resources that'll help me alter my training I would love the recommendations. Because I can't train if I can't move and so far no one has been able to explain a better method for how I can circumvent or even just vent the energy either from myself or my dogs. When we are having an on day, Lana flies like a charm at the end of the leash but those off days crush my heart (cause I know it's me).
I always get stricken by guilt when I read these threads. Until our current girl, we had golden mixes as pet dogs. This time, as retired empty nesters, I wanted a girl I could try learning with in all sorts of performance areas: rally, agility, obedience, who knows. And then pursue whatever my golden and I showed aptitude for. And a generous performance breeder gave me a chance.

Six weeks after we brought Vala home, Covid lockdown happened. Up till then I had been doing everything I could to get her properly socialized with dogs and humans. And some intro to agility as well as obedience private lessons. After lockdown, the best I could do was zoom obedience classes. And I worked at home on getting her a trick dog novice title. Since June, we’ve been doing cancer (mine) and covid lockdown simultaneously. This week, finally, for the first time, we started intro to agility class.

I fear we must be a terrible disappointment to our breeder, though she has been very kind all along. If she is disappointed, she doesn’t say so. My girl’s littermates across the country are already making great strides in dock diving and field work. But we live in a city. Just to get her to swim we had to drive to a swimming pool club for dogs in another city. I am going to stick with agility (chemo allowing), but I am not worthy of my dog. It seems the high aptitude is all on her part and none on mine. Please, breeders, be forgiving of people like me. I don’t know how far we will ever get, but I am doing my best.
I assure you, you aren't! :) I know how you feel though! My boy is 4 years old and we are struggling with Utility while one of his littermates has his OTCH!!! And that's after almost a year off for Covid! My breeder 100% supports me doing the very best I can. My goal was to be a big contributor to either his mom's OD or dad's OS. We are too late for dad....so we are working on getting there for mom. I can't get field work in like I would like either...living in the city and working makes it hard. Around here, there's field training on Wednesday mornings locally or Saturday mornings 2 hours away! As far as dock diving goes, I have to just limit what I'm doing. As much as I would love to do it all, time and money prevent me from doing it! Keep working at it! Your breeder will appreciate every effort you make!
 

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A bit of housekeeping...
  • First, I know that this could be a contentious topic between hobby/preservation breeders and non-hobbyists "just looking for a family companion". So, I'd ask everyone to "just chill".
  • Second, it's possible that this could/should be in the "puppy" section of the forum. However, I see this much more as a general discussion on attitudes and biases (using "bias" in a non-judgmental manner).
With that said...
  • If you are a hobby/preservation breeder reviewing applicants for a litter, do you consider intentions of the applicant as a screening/ranking factor?
  • If you are a hobbyist looking for a new puppy, what is your reaction to getting a puppy other-than-the-top-2-or-3?
  • If you are a "golden enthusiast" (my euphemism for someone who loves the breed, but lacks the commitment to be a hobbyist), how do you feel about getting puppies other-than-the-top-2-or-3? Or, perhaps, being skipped over altogether because of a lack of intent with-respect-to showing/competing in breed events?
As a self-identified "golden enthusiast" (vice "hobbyist"), I am fairly open about my intentions (i.e., family pet, will be well cared for, no intentions to breed, no intentions to show, no intentions to participate in field/other competitions). Given that, I can well understand that a hobby/preservation breeder may not want to place any of their litter in my household, much less those that are believed to have strong potential.

No problem. But, I cannot help but think "not every dog is going to be 'competition material', irrespective of the specific competition". Especially given the scarcity of well-bred litters, how does all this factor into who gets onto a breeder's "short list"? Frankly, given my (admittedly sparse) exposure to the hobbyist community, it would not surprise me if the first 2-to-3 puppies of any litter are already spoken for (i.e., promised to the owner of the dam, sire, and/or one-or-more persons with a personal relationship with the owners of the dam/sire). And, again, I have no issues with this arrangement (assuming it occurs). It's disappointing, at a personal level, as it makes obtaining a well-bred golden more difficult for folks like me. But, perfectly understandable when viewed from the hobbyists' perspective.

On a, hopefully, constructive note, where should enthusiasts-like-me focus our efforts on finding a well-bred golden. Of course, this assumes that "enthusiasts" are a bit disadvantaged with-respect-to placement on a hobby/preservation breeder's short list (and, I'd be quite happy to find out this is not the case), but I prefer to know what I'm dealing with. Frankly, had I known more about what I was potentially facing before starting our search, I may have looked into a different breed.
Fellow Golden Enthusiast.. After losing my boy to (what else) lymphoma in September, 2020 - I embarked on a search for a new Golden pup... I attempted to contact many breeders in the Northeast, willing to drive 6-12 hours to pick one up. NO ONE would even return my inquiries... One just said they simply don't have any available... So, I'm frankly amazed at any conversation where you would actually have a choice of a pup at all... Assuming from your handle you are in Southern California, and maybe you have an abundance of reputable Golden breeders out west where you may even have your choice of breeders... Not so across the country..... If you were on the East Coast, I'd tell you just be happy if ANY breeder would consider selling you a pup for ANY reason... By God's Gracious Hand, and through the daughter of my previous breeder who passed on some years ago, by word of mouth I ended up with a "RE-HOMED" 1.5 year old Golden girl (I actually wanted a male, but knew it was this girl or nothing) I have no regrets and am blessed to have her, she's wonderful. But my point is, even to this day, no breeders ever responded to my applications. And I've owned Goldens as an enthusiast for over 20 years.... Good luck with your search...
 
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