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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 4 month old, Moose, is like a cow and loves grabbing mouthfuls of grass and dirt whenever he has a chance to. I was leaving him unleashed when over at my parents because their backyard is all fenced in, that is until I caught him with one of these mushrooms in his mouth. I think he may have swallowed one or part of one and I watched him like a hawk for the rest of the night to see if I could notice any signs of him not feeling well but he was completely normal. It still makes me nervous and I now leash him whenever we go outside at my parents so I can keep him from eating any mushrooms (and have more control over him tearing up their lawn).

Heres a few pictures of the mushrooms, there's been a lot of rain where live which has resulted in a lot more mushrooms growing than there normally is (I live in NY). The first image is of a fresh live mushroom, the second two pictures they are already withering away but are what I find most of all over the lawn in certain areas.

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Mushrooms scare me. ID ing a mushroom is not easy, it's not so much how they look from the top or even their color, etc but also the shape of the underside gills and base, veil, stalk, I don't think I would trust an app for it- would rather ask an expert.
 

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I'm also in NY and lately, with all the rain, my land is like a mushroom farm.
Keep a close watch on Moose. I would not trust ANY mushroom growing in the yard. At 4 months, many pups are still finding lots of "interesting" items to put in their mouths. Even on leash walks, I had to really watch because in grass it was sometimes hard to tell if he was using his mouth or just his nose.
 

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We have this issue currently in the uk. We’ve had lots rain the hot weather the rain again and repeat.
It’s caused lots of these little mushrooms to pop up in garden and nearby playing field. But they really small.
Teddy is such a cow eating lots of grass.
We’ve been mowing the lawn lots to keep it short to try to prevent him from eating them.

But if you have a large garden or lots land like some of you in the USA do I imagine it’s a game of vigilance to stop them eating the mushrooms.

As I knew mushrooms were toxic for dogs, but never had such a 🐄 / 🐕 I called the vet a couple weeks ago and ask what would happen if Teddy (fully grown 40kg male) ate one of the tiny mushrooms. She said re the ones that come up in the garden, he’d be ok if just one possibly have an upset tummy (he hasn’t). But to still avoid him ingesting them as much as humanly possible.
 

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Call your local Poison Control Center, they can help you identify the mushroom and what needs to be done. Good Luck....
 

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Having hunted with dogs for about 4 decades now, I think it is unlikely that serious harm will come from a dog eating mushrooms. Dogs quartering a field when upland hunting taste lots of things including mushrooms. Anything that disagrees with their stomach gets vomited. Every pup I have ever had has tried to taste, lick or bite a toad. After coughing and foaming from the mouth for ten minutes they leave the toads alone.
My Lily has a thing for mushrooms that grow on a couple tree stumps in the yard. I discourage it but she always has a bunch already eaten, apparently they are harmless.
 

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Most mushrooms will probably cause an upset stomach at worst, but the risk is there.

Anything small and brown should be considered dangerous. Not too many mushrooms will outright kill a dog (in small/moderate quantities) but the small brown ones are notoriously hard to identify and some can be toxic. White mushrooms as well should be avoided, most likely they are innocuous lawn mushrooms but if you don't know what you are looking at you could have the species that will easily kill a dog if eaten (and you too if you chose to partake!).
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the replies all, I'm just going to continue to keep him on a leash whenever he goes outside at my parents at least until he's got 100% recall which right now seems like he'll never have as he never listens when outside... he has very selective hearing even when inside too lol. It's unfortunate because I love seeing him run like a bat out of hell all around the yard but lately the second he gets outside he immediately makes a B-Line to grab a woodchip or sniff something he can chew out of the grass which inevitably becomes a game of "try to catch me before I devour this object in my mouth muhahahahaha!" He's also near impossible to catch when he's playing keep away, its crazy how agile he's become in just 1 month I've had him, I remember him not being able to gain 10-15 feet distance away from me before I could scoop him up. Not anymore, I have to keep chasing him until he either drops whatever is in his mouth by accident and tries to go back and grab it, or he makes a mistake of running too close to me as he's running to the other side of the yard. It's frustrating as hell, but it's also very laughable :ROFLMAO:
 

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He's also near impossible to catch when he's playing keep away, its crazy how agile he's become in just 1 month I've had him, I remember him not being able to gain 10-15 feet distance away from me before I could scoop him up. Not anymore, I have to keep chasing him
Stop doing this, you are teaching him not to come when called and rewarding him with a fun game.
Put a long rope on his collar when you let him out. Don't call him until you have the rope in hand ready to pull him in.
 

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I keep mine away from mushrooms. We've had a lot of rain and mushrooms sprouting everywhere. I go out each morning in our yard and pluck them up and in the garbage can they go. I asked my husband to pull them up if he sees any. Logan listens to "not yours," but Abby (my Cavalier) will eat anything and she's fast. A neighbor's six year old dog died a couple of years ago from eating a mushroom.

I've looked mushrooms up to see how to distinguish the poisonous ones from the non-poisonous. It's difficult to tell -- very similar. We get the white ones, some smaller brown ones, and those disgusting red stinkhorn mushrooms some years.
 

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We've had a lot of rain which has lead to a lot of mushrooms.
I always get rid of them before I let my girl out, she has been really good about leaving any alone I missed.

My girl is never outside without me too so I can keep an eye on her.
 

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Same here, lots of rain and mushrooms. Echo ate a bunch and got really sick. There is a really good app that helps to ID mushrooms, just take a photo and it tells you what it is. It helped me ID what he ate and how serious it was.
It’s called Picture Mushroom.

In our case yellow field caps and mowers mushrooms were eaten. The worst rancid orange watery stool for two weeks and eventually needed antibiotics.

Anyway, agree with everyone. Train the dog to leave it, and if you can’t, pick them before your dog eats them.
 

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Having hunted with dogs for about 4 decades now, I think it is unlikely that serious harm will come from a dog eating mushrooms. Dogs quartering a field when upland hunting taste lots of things including mushrooms. Anything that disagrees with their stomach gets vomited. Every pup I have ever had has tried to taste, lick or bite a toad. After coughing and foaming from the mouth for ten minutes they leave the toads alone.
My Lily has a thing for mushrooms that grow on a couple tree stumps in the yard. I discourage it but she always has a bunch already eaten, apparently they are harmless.
My friend's mastiff died after eating 3 thumb sized mushrooms from their yard, the vet said it was the mushrooms. Just because you've been lucky and your dogs haven't gotten sick from them, does not mean they are safe for dogs to eat. They are not harmless, many are toxic.
 

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My friend's mastiff died after eating 3 thumb sized mushrooms from their yard, the vet said it was the mushrooms. Just because you've been lucky and your dogs haven't gotten sick from them, does not mean they are safe for dogs to eat. They are not harmless, many are toxic.
I did not say they were safe for dogs to eat. I said it was unlikely for mushrooms to cause serious harm to a dog. If there was a significant risk I would have heard of dozens if not hundreds of dogs dying from eating mushrooms.
If anyone is truly concerned they should never let their dog off leash or get an E collar and do some serious aversion training.
 

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I did not say they were safe for dogs to eat. I said it was unlikely he for mushrooms to cause serious harm to a dog. If there was a significant risk I would have heard of dozens if not hundreds of dogs dying from eating mushrooms.
If anyone is truly concerned they should never let their dog off leash or get an E collar and do some serious aversion training.
You should not be telling people there is no risk, when there definitely is.
 

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You should not be telling people there is no risk, when there definitely is.
Read what I said again and tell me where I stated there was no risk.

I did not say they were safe for dogs to eat. I said it was unlikely for mushrooms to cause serious harm to a dog. If there was a significant risk I would have heard of dozens if not hundreds of dogs dying from eating mushrooms.
If anyone is truly concerned they should never let their dog off leash or get an E collar and do some serious aversion training.
 
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