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Marty's Dad
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29 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello, My GR turned 1 about two weeks ago and is not fixed. Each time I took him to the Dog Park he had a great time running around with the other dogs. Last night there were two German Shepard's (1 male and I belive1 female) who were very nasty with him as soon as him came into the park. Marty tried to get along but they would not have it and then it was like a button was pushed and he really went after them. Fortunately we were able to separate them and I took Marty away just in time before it got really ugly. We went on a walk and came back later and just as we were leaving a short haired came to the park and he tried to play with that dog and it went ok for about a minute or two and then that dog started to growl and chase him anytime he got close but it didn't seem the usual play type of chase, so we left.

Today he is pretty moopy and sad, I'll take him out for a long walk after work but I am wondering is he possibly giving off someone that is causing aggression? He has always loved playing with other dogs and nothing like this has happened before, maybe it's a coincidence? Wondering if anyone else has had this happen with their dog?
 

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the party's crashing us
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4,223 Posts
It's not a pheromone, it's a hormone, and it's called testosterone. Welcome to adulthood. This is why most pet owners get their dogs neutered.
 

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Confused Member
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498 Posts
It's not a pheromone, it's a hormone, and it's called testosterone. Welcome to adulthood. This is why most pet owners get their dogs neutered.
Exactly!



This is a meet and greet a few years ago. Bentley is on the left with the breeders I got him from. All the rest of them are his pups.

One of his pups is an intact male that decided He didn’t like Bentley. We had to separate them. Bentley was ok, but his “son” wasn’t going to have any of that!


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Marty's Dad
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29 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
It's not a pheromone, it's a hormone, and it's called testosterone. Welcome to adulthood. This is why most pet owners get their dogs neutered.
My dog was not the aggressor so when you say that it's testosterone are you suggesting that there is a scent given off? Or, it is possible the other dogs were not neutered I don't know. I hear it is better to wait until 18 months for Golden Retrievers to have them neutered so have almost 6 months to go.
 

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Puddles
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3,687 Posts
Do you like everyone you meet? Ever see a group of boys together and have a scuffle? All personalities are different and just because your dog is social doesn't mean the others are. There is so much body language & attitude between them that people just don't see. Some dogs just don't like being in a group... sort of like introverts not liking crowds. If you have a more dominant personality in the group this can be a sign of weakness which in the dog world can cause problems. Find a safe group of dogs you know to play with. Lots of times it's not your dog at all. Many times it's not gender related either. As a former daycare / kennel owner I had more problems with a group of females than the boys.
Just remember the next time you are in a very crowded place and someone accidently gives you a shove... do you blow it off or do you think how rude!
 

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Super Moderator
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912 Posts
Yes. Other dogs immediately know when another dog is intact. They can smell it. That has been my experience, and it changes the dynamics of a group of dogs. We have friends with two intact males and we recently went for a walk with them. All boys were wonderful on the walk, walking and running together off leash, but as soon as we got back into their yard, their oldest boy (3) made it very clear he didn’t like Denver in his space. Denver is younger (20 months) and has a lot of puppy energy. Denver also doesn't understand certain social cues coming from other dogs sometimes. Denver would bark to try to get older boy to play, but the older boy wanted none if it and would get stiff, give Denver the side eye and eventually would growl and a couple times get aggressive to tell Denver to knock it off. We realized he was feeling insecure with Denver's presence, and Denver wasn't getting the hint to leave him alone, so we put him inside. Denver and the younger boy (19months) got to play and all was fine. Every dog is different. Dogs don't always communicate well with each other, especially young males.

Another thing is, dogs don't need to play in large packs. It is often more successful to have dogs play with one or two dogs around the same age that they know very well.
 

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Marty's Dad
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29 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Do you like everyone you meet? Ever see a group of boys together and have a scuffle? All personalities are different and just because your dog is social doesn't mean the others are. There is so much body language & attitude between them that people just don't see. Some dogs just don't like being in a group... sort of like introverts not liking crowds. If you have a more dominant personality in the group this can be a sign of weakness which in the dog world can cause problems. Find a safe group of dogs you know to play with. Lots of times it's not your dog at all. Many times it's not gender related either. As a former daycare / kennel owner I had more problems with a group of females than the boys.
Just remember the next time you are in a very crowded place and someone accidently gives you a shove... do you blow it off or do you think how rude!
These are good points thank you
 

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Marty's Dad
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29 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Yes. Other dogs immediately know when another dog is intact. They can smell it. That has been my experience, and it changes the dynamics of a group of dogs. We have friends with two intact males and we recently went for a walk with them. All boys were wonderful on the walk, walking and running together off leash, but as soon as we got back into their yard, their oldest boy (3) made it very clear he didn’t like Denver in his space. Denver is younger (20 months) and has a lot of puppy energy. Denver also doesn't understand certain social cues coming from other dogs sometimes. Denver would bark to try to get older boy to play, but the older boy wanted none if it and would get stiff, give Denver the side eye and eventually would growl and a couple times get aggressive to tell Denver to knock it off. We realized he was feeling insecure with Denver's presence, and Denver wasn't getting the hint to leave him alone, so we put him inside. Denver and the younger boy (19months) got to play and all was fine. Every dog is different. Dogs don't always communicate well with each other, especially young males.

Another thing is, dogs don't need to play in large packs. It is often more successful to have dogs play with one or two dogs around the same age that they know very well.
Thank you, that makes sense I appreciate it.
 

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Kristy
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9,309 Posts
......dogs don't need to play in large packs. It is often more successful to have dogs play with one or two dogs around the same age that they know very well.
This. A dog park is a disaster waiting to happen. Find one or two friends, neighbors, co workers, etc. who have a nice young dog of similar age/size/breed and see if you can institute puppy play dates a couple times a week. Closely monitored, 20 minutes, it's a great way to get exercise and burn off energy. Otherwise, your dog needs playtime and training with you far more than he needs dog park interactions that could be negative and dangerous.
 

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Confused Member
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498 Posts
I never use dog parks. There are too many variables that can lead to disaster.. plus I’ve watched too many Judge Judy, and the Peoples Court episodes...


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