Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner

21 - 34 of 34 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,788 Posts
It has been a while since I looked at the ranges, but 1.7 sounds low for the thyroid result. If it is below the mid-point of the reference scale, Archer probably needs to be on a thyroid supplement. Here's a reference from one of the leading experts, Dr. Jean Dodds: Thyroid Disease.

When we were researching flea and tick options for Charlie, I learned about food-grade diatomaceous earth. It is a fine crystalline powder that kills fleas and ticks. Here's a link:https://happydognaturals.com/diatomaceous-earth/. Note that the "food-grade" is important; there is also a "pool-grade" that is dangerous for animals. Another option to consider is applying beneficial nematodes to your lawn. These little critters also kill fleas and ticks, as well as termites. Here's more info about them: Beneficial Nematodes for Control of Soil Dwelling Home & Garden Pests - Great for Lawns, Gardens, Yards and Commercial Applications.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,195 Posts
Sadly, early onset seizures can also be genetic in Goldens. I wouldn't be too worried about Teal or Lottie based on what happened to Archer, it may have been completely unrelated to flea/tick meds.
Hoping he is continuing to do well.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ArchersMom

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,398 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
My biggest fear now is that he'll have another one while he's swimming. I don't want to keep him from what he loves, but if it does happen again I have no way to predict it. I could allow him only to swim/hunt in shallow water but even if it was only 2 feet he could drown. His jacket has some floatation but I don't think it could save him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,195 Posts
That's a very legitimate fear. There is no easy answer. Hopefully it was just a one time thing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,788 Posts
Most experts on canine seizures recommend against allowing a seizure dog to swim. Even playing in a kiddie pool with 6 inches of water can be dangerous.

One of our members has rescued her dog several times as he began to seize while swimming. Her approach - being there and being prepared to rescue - seems to work. But you have to be able to handle the dog in water while the seizure is happening.

This is obviously a difficult and very personal decision.

Wishing you all the best,
Lucy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,398 Posts
Discussion Starter #26
True. The water height limit is more so that its possible to rescue him quickly if he did seize. I already decided he won't swim in a lake again. He wears a floatation jacket with a handle, but I wouldn't trust the floatation to save him. He'll just be so disappointed if he never gets to hunt again. We don't need him to, we have Teal now and she's better trained that he is. I'm thinking I will have my husband take her out for at least the beginning of the season. :crossfing: we never see a seizure again and he can at least go out under safer conditions.
 
Joined
·
20 Posts
Sadly, early onset seizures can also be genetic in Goldens. I wouldn't be too worried about Teal or Lottie based on what happened to Archer, it may have been completely unrelated to flea/tick meds.
Hoping he is continuing to do well.
I agree ....my dog has epilepsy, and other dogs from the breeder we got him from have seizures or other neurological disorders too. The breeder wasn't honest when we asked her about seizures in her dogs when we purchased ours. Do you know of anybody else with a dog from the same litter or parents, and are they also having issues with seizures?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,398 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
I don't know anybody else with a dog from his breeder. So far there hasn't been a second seizure, thank goodness. I do wonder if it's stimulus related or not because we do have a suspected trigger and it's actually a sound. He's shown less noticeable symptoms, such as shaking and jerking when we turn on a particular fan. It was in the room, on high next to him when he experienced the bad seizure and that was his first real exposure to it.
 

·
3 goldens
Joined
·
11,907 Posts
I am so sorry. Boy do we know what you are feeling. We adopted our Sophie Feb. 17, 2015 just 5 weeks after her 11th birthday, from her original owners. They had gotten her when she was 5 weeks old due to her mother dying. Then in Aug. 2015--a year ago this month, we came home from store and when I bumped her with front door, she didn't' move---she always slept there til we returned. Bumped her a 2ed time--didn't move at all. She always got right up to great us and my first thought was she had passed on while we were re gone But I finally got door open and saw she was breathing--and also slaw all this poop on her tail and back legs. She tried to get up but back legs wouldn't work at all. I knw it was either a paralyzing stroke or a seizure, tho I had never seen a dog have one.

I had to run and unlock garage door so hubby could get in. Poor Sophie was trying to hard to get to her feet and finally her back legs started moving, but she couldn't get up without oru help. We got her up and helped her out to the patio and by the time we got out there, she was a little wobbly, but walking her on her. We cleaned her up and got her ot the vet. It was a seizure.

No more that we know of. Then in June, a possible one. She LOVES to sleep out in the cool sand under the cedar tree at the side of the house during the days. Got her supper ready and Jerry went out to get her--and she couldn't seem to get her back end up tho she did get into a sitting position. He had to help her u and she was very wobbly and actually fell twice getting to the patio, then no problem. There was no pee or poop this time and so we are not really sure, but it seemed very much like the very tail end of the seizure she had last Aug.

About 5 weeks ago she gother rabies vax. Just about 48 hours later I was here on the computer, hubby laying on bed reading and we heard this noise coming from the hall bathroom, a banging. Sophie was in there sleeping and I knee what it was before I even got up..a seizure. She was on her side, her legs stiff, but was throwing her head backwards hitting the vanity door. Her mouth was working, eyes rolled back. All I could do was sit and put my hand so her head would hit it and not the door. Then after a minute or so, she went limp and just lay there breathing hard. Then she tried to get up and her back legs did work, just not great. And that tile floor is a little slick. Got her to her feet and had to help her walk to the kitchen whre she got a drink, then went out and laid on patio. No pee nor poop.

Was late Sat. afternoon and my vet was not at hospital--he is the only vet in his little hospital, but does a tremendous business as people drive 25 miles out of Corpus for him to treat their dogs and cats. The tech told me that if she had another seizure, call back and she would call Rickey. But she didn't.


Then 3 weeks later, lacking 1 day, same scenario. I was on computer and hubby was taking a nap and I heard the banging in the bathroom. THIS time I yelled for him, he woke up and I told him to get a bag of ice. I had been told about putting the ice on the small of their back. This time her legs wre thrashing, head being thrown back, mouth working, eyes rolled back, and this time it last longer.

She was up against the door so I could not get the ice where I really needed it so I placed it on her shoulder back where I could get it. I would say this one lasted at least 2 minutes, more like 3, before she went limp. She lay there her tongue out and just laying on the floor like she had been put under for surgery or dental, etc. She also appeard to be gasping for air. We put a cool wet rag on the top of her head. It was probably another 3 minutes before she opened her eyes and tried to get up. This time she had pooped and peed on herself. Before we helped her up, I called the vet and my vet was out of town at a seminar, but he did have a sub in and she would see Sophie in about 3 hours. . Got Sophie cleaned up and Jerry had to go to Corpus.

He had had a knot removed from the back of his hand two week before and the biopsy came back, cancer. The doctor wanted him to come in so he could cut out more of the area and "freeze" it. This doctor is always booked solide, but he wanted Jerry in ASAP and set up this appointment. Jerry wanted to cancel it, but I said no, it might be 2 months before he could get back in. I would stay home with Sophie. Jerry got back just in time for us to get her the mile 1/4 to the vet.

Dr. Frey did a full blood panel plus a few other tests. Sophie's liver and kidney's are really good (according to blood work) but she is a little anemic. AND her thyroid is a very low normal. She put Sophie on a very low dose of phenobarbital and some antibiotics and gave her a B12 injection. Apparently a dog Sophies weight, the normal dose would 60-100 MG, depending if you use 2 or 3 mg per kilogram. But she only put Sophie on 30 mg.

We started Sophie on the pheno the next day and it was pitiful. I had read up on it and knew what to expect, but it was worse because Sophie has such bad knees and hips. Bless her heart, she had to be helped up every time she got up, she staggered around like a dunk man, falling down. When she pooped, she would fall over backwards in it. When she peed she either ended u sitting down where she peed or laying down. She improved after a few days, then got bad again and it was so hard watching her struggle so hard to get up and just dragging her back half I took her off the stuff after a week.. She turned 12 on Jan. 8, has those really bad knees and hips, and I just don't think it is worth it to see her struggle so hard. We go to the vet on Tuesday--had thought it was Monday, but it is me going on Monday, her appointment is Tuesday. and I am going to see if we can do something else. maybe thyroid meds will work.

I have read up on ocular compression. She has allergies and gets gunk her eyes and I hae to clean her eyes out with buffered salad solution on cotton balls a couple of times a day. Because it is sticky and gets in her eye lashes and around her eyes when I clean her eyes (it is under the lower lids), I douse up another cotton ball and clean all around her eyes (she LOVES this) and practice that ocular compression while doing this. And we have a gall bag of ice prepared and in the freezer. Maye I was wrong to take her of the pheno, but she is enjoying being able to walk without falling, being able to get up without having to be lifted up, being able to go potty without falling in it. Had she been younger and without the horrid hips and knees, I would not have done so, but at her age, her joints, well, I just want her to enjoy life as much as she can.
 

·
3 goldens
Joined
·
11,907 Posts
I know how heart breaking it will be to keep him from hunting. My son trained our first golden--actually he bought the puppy-- to be a duck retriever and Scooter was retrieving at 6 months. If Scooter so much as saw Ron wearing camo's, heard the bag of decoys rattle, saw Ron cleaning his shotgun, he was dancing on his toenails.

I think it was at the next to last day of the season Scooter was 3, he cut his leg just above his foot, mostly likely on oyster shells, don't know. Ronnie came home in a panic as Scooter was bleeding so bad. Got him in the tub to clean the mud and salt water off and could see it was a very nasty cut. the vet didn't want to stitch it, but did a tight bandage and put him on antibiotics.


Now where we hunted, the water was never more than hip deep and it was not necessary to have a dog because you could wade out and pick up the ducks. Ronnie had killed 99 ducks that season and he wanted that 100th plus and there was just the one day left. But he would not go because Scooter couldn't go and he knew Scoter would be so upset and hurt to be left behind. So Ron settled for just getting 99 that year

A couple of pictures. In the one, Ron had knocked down two ducks and he went after one, Scooter after the other. The one Ron was after managed to get up and fly off, but Scooter came in with his life Pintail. He was 6 months old and that duck was almost as big as he was! That doc had such a soft mouth, he never ruffled a feather much less left a tooth mark on any duck, dead or alive. The other picture was taken in our garage after a hunt. He was 7 months old in this picture.
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: ArchersMom
Joined
·
20 Posts
I don't know anybody else with a dog from his breeder. So far there hasn't been a second seizure, thank goodness. I do wonder if it's stimulus related or not because we do have a suspected trigger and it's actually a sound. He's shown less noticeable symptoms, such as shaking and jerking when we turn on a particular fan. It was in the room, on high next to him when he experienced the bad seizure and that was his first real exposure to it.
It certainly could have been triggered by a particular noise, but you may never know and you could drive yourself crazy trying to figure it out. Try and keep a log if he has reoccurring seizures. Note dates, times, food ingested, stimulus, environment, etc.. You may see a pattern or you may not. Hopefully you'll take all this information in and never need it again.

With my epileptic dog I know that he does better in a quite, stress free environment. No surprises, loud music or rowdy football cheering guests! He likes his routines, so his routine is our routine. BTW I've kept a log for years, I have studied it & his doctors have studied it. Unfortunately, there has been no rhyme or reason to his seizure pattern except that they occur every 10-14 days usually. We're very in tune with our dog and we can usually tell when he is in the pre-ictal stage, with that we're able to double up on a dose of his meds and give him a Valium suppository to prevent the actual seizure. With seizures the goal is to not allow that neurological pathway to become a well traveled highway. My guys seizures are very bad and we have no alternative but to treat them with several medications, it becomes a balancing act between seizure control and trying not to cause damage to his kidneys & liver due to the medications.

Best of luck to you and Archer
 

·
3 goldens
Joined
·
11,907 Posts
We were not home when Sophie had her first seizure--that we know of--but when we would leave the house, she would go lay in the front hall to wait. Would sleep there and when I pushed on the door, it would bumper and she would wake and get up. That day the actually thrashing, head jerking, etc was over and she was drained. So even tho we suspect she was asleep when it happened, we can't know for sure..

These last two, to, she was sleeping in the hall bathroom when the seizures came on. We had no warning, nothing. There was not one thing different about either of those days. So we have no warning, nothing. We hate to leave the house
 
Joined
·
20 Posts
We were not home when Sophie had her first seizure--that we know of--but when we would leave the house, she would go lay in the front hall to wait. Would sleep there and when I pushed on the door, it would bumper and she would wake and get up. That day the actually thrashing, head jerking, etc was over and she was drained. So even tho we suspect she was asleep when it happened, we can't know for sure..

These last two, to, she was sleeping in the hall bathroom when the seizures came on. We had no warning, nothing. There was not one thing different about either of those days. So we have no warning, nothing. We hate to leave the house
I feel your pain, coming home to find that your baby has seized while you were away is heartbreaking. We rarely leave our dog home alone. We never want him to go through a seizure by himself but clearly not everybody is able to do that. Do the best you can, leave her in a safe area where she is least likely to hurt herself.

It's not uncommon for a epileptic dog to seize while sleeping, we always isolate our boy to our bedroom at night. That way if he has a problem we'll hear him. We've become very good at "reading" our dog, we can usually tell that a seizure is imminent.
 

·
3 goldens
Joined
·
11,907 Posts
When we go to church, we do not dilly-dally around afterwards talking we we use to, but head straight home. I usually make out grocery lists for hubby and he does most of the shopping without me.

But we also hae times we hae no choice. Last Wedneday we were gone 3 hours as we both had appointments with our cardiologist. Both had to have EKG and then have our pace makers checked, etc. And it takes about 30 minutes to get over there and back. This morning we had to go to next town to have blood drawn for our quarterly checks with our primary doctor. Were gone 1 1/2 hours for that.

And net week, we have to drive to the cardiologist so I cane have my yearly nuclear stress test and that takes almost 4 hours, and then because of having leg cramps, they ar going to do a 30 minute test to see if they need to investigate more about possible blockage in some of my leg veins. So we are in for a long time away from home. If I could see to drive, he would stay here with Sophie.

She has such bad hips and knees and the way she was falling while on phemo I was scared she was going to dislocate something or even break something. I decided that at her age it was not worth it. I took her off and she has been so happy. I take her out front on a leash at night to do her last business and the last few nights she has all but drug me down the sidewalk to investigate stuff, and tonight she actually barked for the first time in a long time. We go to the vet tomorrow and I am going to talk to him about putting her on thyroid meds since her thyroid was a very low normal. Yesterday morning I looked the window and saw her rolling, something I had not seen her do in weeks. I think I would rather have her have a shorter life than be injured while on a drug to control he seizures. But I am going to talk to my vet.
 

Attachments

21 - 34 of 34 Posts
Top