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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone!

Before I ask my question, let me introduce myself (first post!) -
I am a Doctor (born and brought up in the UK, had an English cream golden, truly my best friend until he sadly passed away last year, I have done my university (college) training in the UK, I am now a Doctor and a few years ago I moved to Houston, Texas.
My hours are so erratic, I can be in the hospital from 7 am to 9 pm sometimes, or I have night shifts, can be called to come in whenever, put strains on relationships I had.
With my dog passing away last year (he was still in England with my parents).
I really feel the need for a new companion, however, I live in a 1 bedroom apartment.

Now my question is, with my hours, would it be fair?
I don't mind having someone come over a few times a day to take the pup out, however, say he needs to go while no one is there at home, what solutions do I have?
I am a very active person, I run around 3-4 miles a day, so the pup will always be taken out whenever I am home.
Being single, the pup would be alone at home quite a lot.

You see I really want a golden again, they truly are the best breed, I just don't want anything to be unfair on the dog.
Any advice would be appreciated,

Thank you.
 

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I don't think the apartment would be a problem, but the schedule might especially if you are looking for a puppy.

I live in a small townhome and my pup is currently only allowed on the first floor (she is 4.5 months, first floor includes LR, DR, small kitchen). I have to make the effort to get her out a couple times a day but that certainly isn't insurmountable and I've seen people on these boards who live in high-rise condo type situations with a golden. Again, the commitment to get out at least a couple times a day is, I think, crucial.

The bigger issue for you is probably the time. I waited to get my dog until after I finished my dissertation and am now almost tenured, so I know the pressure of career demands. I am, thankfully, now at a point where I can take a summer "off" and not have to worry as much, so I knew this would be the best time to get a pup. For you, perhaps an older dog that's already at least somewhat trained and doesn't have quite as much energy would work, but puppies really do require quite a bit of time. Plus, it would be a while before the pup would be ready for the level of activity you're describing (most recommend no running for at least the first year to protect joints. At 4.5 months, mine is walking about 2 - 2.5 miles, but that takes much more time than a walk on my own.)

Best of luck in your search for companionship!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't think the apartment would be a problem, but the schedule might especially if you are looking for a puppy.

I live in a small townhome and my pup is currently only allowed on the first floor (she is 4.5 months, first floor includes LR, DR, small kitchen). I have to make the effort to get her out a couple times a day but that certainly isn't insurmountable and I've seen people on these boards who live in high-rise condo type situations with a golden. Again, the commitment to get out at least a couple times a day is, I think, crucial.

The bigger issue for you is probably the time. I waited to get my dog until after I finished my dissertation and am now almost tenured, so I know the pressure of career demands. I am, thankfully, now at a point where I can take a summer "off" and not have to worry as much, so I knew this would be the best time to get a pup. For you, perhaps an older dog that's already at least somewhat trained and doesn't have quite as much energy would work, but puppies really do require quite a bit of time. Plus, it would be a while before the pup would be ready for the level of activity you're describing (most recommend no running for at least the first year to protect joints. At 4.5 months, mine is walking about 2 - 2.5 miles, but that takes much more time than a walk on my own.)

Best of luck in your search for companionship!
Yes, time is a huge problem for me. The problem with me is, even if I postpone my decision to get a golden, in a years time I'll be in the same position, in 5 years time I'll still be in the same position (with my hours at least). I was thinking about obedience classes for being left alone, and maybe just maybe, as you mention, getting a slighter older pup who is house trained. Sigh, I shall keep thinking haha.
Thanks for your help.
 

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First of all, welcome to the forum! I think everything Sarah J said is spot on. The apartment itself is definitely not an issue. When we first got our pup, we were in a 3rd floor 1 bedroom apartment, which made potty training very hard (we still did it, though, and our boy cottoned on very quickly, thank goodness!). The time commitment is a different story. You have to be prepared to take your puppy out every 1.5-2 hrs, sometimes every 30 minutes if he/she has played or eaten, when you first get the pup (tiny bladders at that age!). You have to invest some time in crate training and of course general training. An obedience class will tell you what to do, but you have to then go back home and practice it with the puppy to reinforce it. We are two people with full time work schedules and even with the two of us staggering our work days it was (and has been) hard enough. Further, a really good breeder will give you the third degree on your work schedule and ask for a clear plan on how you plan to raise and train your pup. I second Sarah J and suggest maybe rescuing an older dog that is alright with being home alone longer and enjoys long runs when you are home. Keep in mind though that goldens are really people dogs, and would be happiest when you are around :)!
 

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I agree. The apartment's not the problem. The long and unpredictable hours are. Probably not the right time to get a Golden.
 

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To echo everyone else, we live in a 525 sq. ft. one bedroom apartment and Foster would be glued to our hips regardless of where we lived. However, we were fortunate to work opposite shifts the first several months of his life, so he is only recently home alone. If you plan to send your pup to daycare every day or pay for a dog walker/sitter, that's one thing. But maybe consider adopting an older dog instead of a puppy?
 
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