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Questions....I've got plenty. With all the experts here it's a gold mine of information and experience. I've been golden deprived since I lost Boomer last year but I'm pretty sure I'm going to adopt a rescue....will find out for sure tomorrow. I've visited him twice and he seems like a sweet guy. He's about 4 or 5 years old and I'm just wondering the best way to get him settled in his new home. Should I crate him at night, while at work or give him the kitchen area while we are gone. I would hate to crate him at night and then again during the day. Some work days are long some short 3-4 hours. This is my biggest concern. Boomer was raised as a pup so we sort of knew how to handle it. He was allowed very early in life to have whole house privileges. It will take some time to get to know the new guy. Any ideas or suggestions on welcoming this guy into our home is much appreciated. Never rescued and never started with an adult dog. Thank you all so much.
 

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Now Caue's Dad Too!
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It would be an ideal time to take a weeks vacation to get to know each other if at all possible. Even a long weekend would give you some time to get to know your new boy. An adult dog that has never been in a crate could be very stressful for the dog. Best of luck to you and thank you for rescuing.
 

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Knife Swallower
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The biggest thing is to allow as much time as it takes to allow him to get used to the routine and start "coming out of his shell". It's not uncommon for rescue dogs to immediately adapt to the routine of the household but it'll usually take a little longer for their "true selves" to shine through. Remember that depending on his beginning to life, he may not know things that most people take for granted...the things learned in puppyhood, for instance. I had to teach my rescue dog not to use his teeth in play since he'd never learned. All basic commands had to be taught, same with household rules. So take it slow, don't put pressure on yourself or him, and start from scratch. Work on crate-training in the evenings if he's not already crate-trained (and even if he is, it's always good for a refresher). Use his kennel up cue, toss a cookie in, and praise him when he goes in to get it. Repeat, repeat, repeat but don't shut the door just yet.

If you're worried about crate training, go out and buy some kongs. I like to have two on hand so one's always in the freezer. That makes crate-training a breeze! Ranger got to the point where he wouldn't even wait for me to use his verbal cue; he saw me with the kong and would bolt into his kennel as fast as possible.

Just remember to take it slow, but don't mollycoddle either. Establish the routine you're going to want to have 6 months down the road. If you don't want him on the bed/couch then, don't let him up now. That's pretty much it! I spent the first night awkwardly following Ranger around the house as we were both a little uncertain as to what was going on. It felt so odd to have "my" dog and he had been through a lot of upheaval himself. I took him for a walk, gave him some toys, showed him where his water was, and then I watched tv and petted him all night.

Have fun, enjoy your new dog, and take a ton of pics! Bless you for adopting a rescue dog!
 

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Is he currently in a foster home? If so, talk to his foster parents and see what sort of containment works best for the boy, you may be able to get away with baby-gating him at night and a crate during the day. I agree with Oaklys Dad to allow some extra time getting him settled in. Good luck with the adoption process!
 

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My first question to you is do you own or rent your home? If you own your home and are unable to take a few days off to get him settled then I would leave him a small area such as the kitchen or bathroom. I would make sure he had a good bone to chew on to keep him busy. If you rent I would get a crate for him and then work on him being alone in the house for short periods of time. I would not crate him at night that should be part of your bonding time. I would get him a nice pillow and place it by our bed. If you are worried about him roaming at night I would shut the bedroom door so he cant leave. Good luck and I can not wait to hear all about the new guy. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Is he currently in a foster home? If so, talk to his foster parents and see what sort of containment works best for the boy, you may be able to get away with baby-gating him at night and a crate during the day. I agree with Oaklys Dad to allow some extra time getting him settled in. Good luck with the adoption process!
Thanks everyone. Great stuff for me. He is currently at a vets office living in a run. (I was told he never has soiled his run he waits to go outside) He was brought to the vet to be euthanized by family members of the owner who neglected him. He weighed only 35 pounds when he came in and near death...the vet asked to keep him instead and has nursed the guy back to health. He weighed 57 last Friday!
 

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If he's not soiling his run, then he has the basics of potty-training which is a bonus. Ask the vet what his schedule is for getting to go outside to relieve himself. Thank heavens for the vet that allowed this boy to have a future and to you for considering adopting. Things I'd want to know going into an adoption is whether or not he's dog friendly, a little more difficult to determine at a vets office as the staff isn't going to use patients as guinea pigs, but how does he react to other dogs walking past his run. And whatever the answer is, are you willing to accept the answer. He certainly sounds promising!
 

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It's always best to start with structure, crating or restricting him to a small area, until you get to know him and he learns your routine. Over a couple of weeks you will find out what level of trust you can give him, and let him earn more freedom as he becomes more trustworthy.

Thank you for adopting and congratulations on your new boy!
 
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