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I'm only seventeen and around where I live I cannot own a dog legally until I"m eighteen. That being said I live with my parents who are more than happy to "own" the dog under their names until I'm eighteen.

So my question is, if you were a breeder, would you think that I'm still too young and irresponsible to take care of a Golden? Would the fact that I'm only seventeen turn the breeder off?

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! :)
 

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Haha, by "legally own a dog" I meant having my name registered in the system as the dog's owner. Though I could be wrong since I just saw someone saying "no responsible breeder would sell to anyone under 18" on Yahoo Answers. Uh-oh, am I misinformed?
 

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I would think it would be based off the individual.

I know some young teens who are much more responsible than 30-something-year-olds.
 

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gone
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Haha, by "legally own a dog" I meant having my name registered in the system as the dog's owner. Though I could be wrong since I just saw someone saying "no responsible breeder would sell to anyone under 18" on Yahoo Answers. Uh-oh, am I misinformed?
Yahoo Answers is not a reliable source of information, ask a breeder directly your questions about dog ownership.
 

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Kate
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I think it doesn't really matter how old you are if you are older than 10.

The questions the breeder may ask are regarding the home and finances for the dog. You are 18 and may be moving out soon. Or going on to college. Or job hunting.
 

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Dr. Rainheart
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I agree with Megora, it depends on what your plans are and how financially responsible you can be. When I was searching for Beamer, I was 20 at the time and a lot of breeders were weary/never messaged me back since I was a college student. Thankfully some great breeders trusted in me. I am not sure how willing they will be with a 17 year old; you'll just have to speak to them.
 

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I got my boy when I was 17, I actually got him from Alberta, he has a very nice pedigree, although I have been involved with goldens seriously with the help of my parents since I was 10 or so... I don't think it is a black and white matter. Each person at this age is a different maturity. It also helps that your parents want this dog too. A reputable breeder would never let a puppy go to a home where someone in the family didn't enthusiastically want the puppy. So that still applies. It is important to know what your plans are for the future....college is a big expense and you might not be able to bring the dog (most schools in the states you most certainly can not, especially living on campus) will your parents be able to financially and physically properly care for the dog while you are away?
 

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I think your age in and of itself is not an issue... my questions would be regarding who is really going to take care of he dog... how are YOU at 18 going to support the dog and the emergencies... are you planning to go off to college and if so what happens to dog when that happens... are you planning to continue to live at home or get an apt. and if so what happens to dog if you can't find an apt. that will take a large dog...

I would want to know that you have thought those things out... I did place a puppy with a girl who was just 21 an was starting graduate school.... the arrangement was that I interviewed her entire family... the puppy would belong to the girl but when things got crazy at school the pup would go back to her parents house until things calmed down again... so basically the pup had two homes. The parents helped her out financially which was good cause the pup ate a sock.... and it has worked out great...

so your age in and of itself would not be an issue... the logistics about how you were going to care for hte pup over the long term would be the questions that would need to be answered in my mind.
 

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I agree with what many have said. What a wonderful way to both learn and demonstrate you ability to own and PROPERLY care for another living thing. Here in the the US, teenagers in rural areas learn that sort of thing all the time through our 4H program.

That being said, I would expect many breeders would be leery of selling a puppy to someone your age. But leery is not a NO. If this is something you want to do then showing the perseverance to work through the quick rejections and find that breeder who will take a chance is the first step in demonstrating the determination and persistence that caring for a dog will require. But a responsible breeder is going to ask you questions that they would not ask of an adult. Don't take offense to that with your replies. Show your maturity by letting them know you understand why they are asking the questions they do. Don't be surprised if they want to talk to your parents and ask if they are going to be willing to take the dog if your life takes a turn and you can no longer take care of the dog. There are just far too many dogs that are sold into homes what appear a good place that end up back in rescues organizations and shelters. So they will want some assurance that if your life takes a turn, there is a place for the dog. REMEMBER, you are about to make a choice that will require you to sacrifice and make decisions you might not otherwise make until you are in your 30's and you are the only real lifeline for the dog. It will affect where you can go to school, what type of work you can do, where you can live, and what you can do for recreation for the next 15 years. Properly caring for dogs requires money. We find that on average, it costs about $800-$1000 per year to own and care for an animal. And that is a mandatory expense just like paying rent and buying food for you to eat.

One final thought, maybe you would be better off to try owning an older rescue dog or adopt one from the shelter. That way, if you find that the effort to properly care for the dog is more than what you want to make, your time of commitment is shorter. But even then you need to enter into that commitment as one that you will carry out as long as the dog is alive.
 

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Kate
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One final thought, maybe you would be better off to try owning an older rescue dog or adopt one from the shelter. That way, if you find that the effort to properly care for the dog is more than what you want to make, your time of commitment is shorter. But even then you need to enter into that commitment as one that you will carry out as long as the dog is alive.
I don't think this comment was trying to say this, but I had to respond simply because I do see these comments a lot on this forum... but those rescue dogs are not "throwaway" dogs that require less commitment, financial ability, and solid living conditions than a puppy purchased from a breeder.

Our two old men (Sammy and Danny) were mostly healthy and rarely saw the vet until the end. Sammy had a $2000 surgery when he was ten, because of a tumor that ruptured. And we didn't try adding up all the vet bills for his last year - he had been to the vet quite a lot because of mobility issues and various health things going on (lots of xrays too). Danny had almost $1000+ in vet bills in his last year because of bronchitis that was trying to go into pneumonia + we spent $2500 for a surgery that he never woke up from.

People who adopt adult or older dogs need to recognize that there is a financial commitment that they need to make to these dogs. Especially since they've already been "recycled" and have a lot of stress they are recovering from. They need a very solid home and competent owners who will help them adapt to their new life.

We adopted an adult collie and I completely support people who adopt or are thinking of adopting... but it is not the "easy" way of owning a dog. There are still difficulties.
 

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Kate, you are correct. I was not implying that an older dog was a throw away dog or that the challenges are any easier. I was simply trying to say that assuming a fifteen year life span, an older dog might cut the seventeen year olds time of commitment in half. As far as the medical bills, that is part of the cost of owning any dog particularly when they reach their elder years -just like us humans :(. So I did not see that as an increased cost.

What got me to even post a reply was that I felt I was very responsible at seventeen. But as I reflected on what happened in my life between 17 and 32, there was no way I could have owned a dog and cared for it properly if for no other reason than my work situation which required I travel and the boarding cost would have been too much.

Thanks for adding the additional insight however about the costs associated with the latter years.
 

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I'm not a breeder myself so I can't really speak for them but I got my first golden Spiffy when I was only 15. I raised him and trained him completely by myself.

Now, my parents were financially responsible for him at that age because I wouldn't have been able to afford vet bills, etc. but I was the one who was responsible for him otherwise. :)
 

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SunGold and Huckleberry: Did you have them until they passed away or are they still alive? How old were/are you? That was the point of my post - not that you can't take care of them in the early years, but are you willing to take care of them when you are in your mid to late 20's?
 

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Kate
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SunGold and Huckleberry: Did you have them until they passed away or are they still alive? How old were/are you? That was the point of my post - not that you can't take care of them in the early years, but are you willing to take care of them when you are in your mid to late 20's?
For what it's worth... the dogs we got as a family during my early through late teens, my sisters and I shared the responsibility with our parents. We took care of the routine bills (vaccinations, heartworm prevention, minor office visits like urinalysis, blood checks, gastro, etc...). It was understood that if anything major happened, our parents would help us out.

The dog training, btw, was totally handled by us. It was our hobby.

When we had our "RUNNING AWAY FROM HOME AND NEVER COMING BACK" tantrums, they always included the dogs. :D

When my sister got married, she left her dog with us - and that was mainly because he would not have done well in an apartment without his brother. He was 7 years old at the time. She wanted him with her, but didn't want to uproot him. So sometimes it's not about what you want, but what's best for the dog.

She still took care of him, took him to dog class, showed him, took him on weekend trips, took care of his vet bills... he was her dog.

That is why a breeder will ask questions about the future plans beyond home. It's something everyone needs to consider - and that's whether the dog is a purchased puppy or an adopted adult. Dogs bond with their people, and the other way around.
 

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goldenfan
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As a breeder I would say that each case is individual and there are no set rules, just as there can't be for older people wanting a puppy. I had my first dog at 15 taking him over from my parents. They looked after him whilst I was at College and when I got married he came with me. He came to our wedding, stole the remains of our wedding cake, loved our baby and all the puppies. I took my prefix from his name so every dog I have owned since then is named in memory of him. Annef
 
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