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Life is Golden !
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Hello!

As you all know I have posted a few threads about Kody these past couple of months. He is still testing me and driving us all crazy at times with his behavior. I was wondering if I am doing the wrong thing by putting Kody in his crate when he is misbehaving. If he is doing something he knows he is not allowed to do, then less than a minute later after me telling him NO he is at it again.:doh: I am putting him in his crate for 15 mins or so, then letting him back out. I dont want to confuse him...so I wanted your opinion. Just trying to get thru to him and not getting anywhere. Its the same things day in and day out....its as if he is not even phased that I am telling him NO!!!
 

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Now Caue's Dad Too!
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Time outs are an acceptable form of discipline. He is at a very tough age but you will make it through. A basic obedience class may be of help to you two. They are lots of fun.
 

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He may not care that you're telling him no. Sometimes, human as we are, we overuse words to the point that they lose meaning as cues to our dogs. Many, many people do this with their dog's name... many more do it with the word no. Consider switching to a different cue... an ah-ah, a phooey, or something that you're not saying all the time in all manner of ways. It may just take that little change to get through to him.

As to your actual question, time outs are perfectly fine. Just make sure you are not putting him in the crate in an "angry" fashion... or you could wind up with a dog who is afraid of his crate, or simply detests it. Best of luck with your pup!

Julie and Jersey
 

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I agree with the other two.
 

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Time outs are fine to help him to "reset" his mind and start again, but they aren't good discipline. You can't tell a dog "if you do that again, you're going in the crate." The crate is a nice, safe space, so it won't teach he's been "bad."

Now, I don't believe in relying on "bad dog" anyway, but the crate isn't the way to teach it. It's probably confusing him that you're saying "no, no" and then crating him.

If your problem is that he's wild, can you increase his exercise? And what kind of obedience training are you going through? It seems like your "no" doesn't have much meaning for him, and he doesn't understand how to work for you.
 

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I'm not sure if I used the crate as a form of "discipline" but when Bailey was younger and would get into one of her "crazy" moods - I put her in her crate to calm down and regroup. It wasn't out of anger, but rather a preventative measure to AVOID some serious anger ;) To this day, her crate is her "chill out" space - and she actively seeks that space when she is too wound up. A wound up puppy is NOT a happy puppy, despite how it seems!
 

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experience from 9 month golden

I totally agree with tippykyak! My experience with our 9 month old has been...

Exercise, excerise, excerise! Both mental and physical. Play fetch with him outside for a good 20 minutes, then take him for a 15-30 minute walk, and watch how calm he is for you at home :)

When he is in acalmer than natural state, do some basic obedience. You can find many methods through Google for training your dog commands like sit, stay, spin, and more advancedtricks and commands.

We don't often use the crate for punishment per se. If he does something outrageously mischievous it is usually when he is over tired or bored. If he is bored, we've neglected our duties of exercising him. When tired (because Goldens ALWAYS want to play and will keep themselves awake for your attention) he gets grumpy and often throws tamper-tantrums by getting into trouble. So, a crate is the perfect solution. He really is a crate baby.
 

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PS - one more thing about exercise: mental stimulation is just as important as physical motion for helping a puppy be calm and satisfied. There's a strong working drive in the GR genes, and if you can combine physical exercise with games that trigger the working drive (fetch, search, smell, think), it helps exhaust the puppy's brain too.
 
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