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Esquire Golden Retrievers
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There are a million reasons why a young adult might be placed. I may place a young adult girl of ours. She and her half-sibling have just decided they don't like each other, and they suddenly started fighting. I've never had that problem before. And frankly, if it persists it's not a trait I want in my breeding program. So I might place one of them.
 

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Thank you so much for this thoughtful and thorough reply! Yes, I'm inclined to be wary of the availability of a young adult. Just remembering how much having a puppy is like having a baby...
Puppies ARE like infants. Lots of work. Which is why a grown out one costs more- if you are dealing with an honest breeder then I would not be wary of a older pup/young animal. I agree w Dana- there are a million reasons why, not all or even most of them a reason to worry. If you aren't showing the dog, the thing that might be a reason to place one won't be something you'd even notice in most cases. I have a thing about ear leather. I only like it thick and supple. I would place a keeper whose ears did not please me- since it is important to ME I would not want to use a dog lacking it in my breedings going forward.
 

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I wouldn't be wary of an older pup/young adult. A couple of years ago, I purchased a 10-month old female from Bearabella and a 16-month old male from My Buddy. Both dogs are delightful, very sweet, and are easy to train. Both were kept by their breeder for possible conformation purposes but ultimately the breeders realized they had other dogs better suited and more likely to complete a championship so they placed them in a pet home.

Now, I will say - if you get an older puppy/young adult it is IMPERATIVE that you have a conversation with the breeder about what the dog has been doing. In my case, Helena (Bearabella) and Leah (My Buddy) had the dogs around their other dogs so they were socialized to dogs. Additionally, they had lots of human contact so they're incredibly friendly.

I would be wary of an older pup/young adult that has not been appropriately socialized; however, I'd say that's probably rare if you're working with a breeder who follows the GRCA's COE because those tend to be breeders who really care about their dogs and aren't likely to abandon the puppy in a crate with no socialization.

I would add that when I worked with Bearabella and My Buddy, I went through many of the same conversations you would have if you were acquiring a puppy. I told the breeders what I was looking for in a dog and a lot about our lifestyle. Helena had two older puppies/young adults available when we spoke and after our discussion she immediately ruled out one of the two, saying, "One dog wouldn't fit with your living situation so you'd both be unhappy but the other one is perfect." I find that a good breeder cares just as much about a good match for an older puppy/young adult as they do about the placement of an 8-week-old puppy.
 

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YES! The lady who breeds these babies has done it for years and years and my friend continually gets her puppies from her. They have a clean record, live long, clean bill of health and are adorable and perfect! She is picking her new baby up next week! I can connect you with her client who is my best friend and you can always ask for info and pictures!
 

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Not really... Alpine White's current litter is out of : Pedigree: Walyuta iz Stolitsy Urala and her clearances are not only not verifiable, but done underaged. Nothing has changed there. Sire: Pedigree: JRUS/JCLUB CH/RUS CH Angelonato Hurricane also underaged, no verifiable clearances, eyes listed are 3 years out of date (K9data- not OFA) and it appears from the change history he has been in the US for several years...
Again- nothing changed- these are not breeders who are using best practices by a long stretch.
 
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