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Grumpy Old Man
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I guess I have to point out that wiffle bat, healing sticks, whatever are adjustable. You don’t have to go full Babe Ruth with every swing. Just a tap is all it takes and for every tap you should be petting your pup with it many times.
you're wasting your breath. They don't get it.
 

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Puddles
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I guess I have to point out that wiffle bat, healing sticks, whatever are adjustable. You don’t have to go full Babe Ruth with every swing. Just a tap is all it takes and for every tap you should be petting your pup with it many times.
The action of striking in frustration or anger with anything is never good advice. It does not show the dog who is in charge, it shows the dog he is in control and you are frustrated.
I've been training dogs obedience & manners since the 1960's, hundreds of different breeds. I've volunteered for years with rescues to help dogs like this so they are adoptable. The basic rule of training is NEVER train when you are angry or frustrated.
Does this person need help with this dog, absolutely. This is a high energy dog they are not experienced enough to handle. Most people don't understand that all goldens are not the quiet tempered dogs they see in pictures. They buy whatever puppy they can find without understanding what they are getting. Would this pup be a problem for someone with experience or active in some venue, probably not. Most people don't understand that it's more than providing an energy outlet, they need training to learn self control.
You have the right to train your own dog as you see fit but to continue to advice people that have no experience to inflict pain to make their dog comply is poor advice for a public forum. This person needs help and has hired a trainer to help. But nothing is going to improve in 3 lessons.
 

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Grumpy Old Man
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The action of striking in frustration or anger with anything is never good advice
Who said anything about beating a dog in anger or frustration? You're bringing in your own preconceptions.
 

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Puddles
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The action of striking in frustration or anger with anything is never good advice
Who said anything about beating a dog in anger or frustration? You're bringing in your own preconceptions.
I''m bringing my years of experience working with people that don't know the difference between a tap vs a hit. I've seen hundreds of people put a prong collar on and not know how to use it so the dog pulls them down the street. I've seen people that purchase an e-collar and zap the hell out of a dog because they think this will resolve their issue quickly. I've seen others that use a fly swatter or rolled up newspaper and then wonder why the dog runs from them or snaps at them when they pick these objects up.
I'm not against either product, I'm against people thinking these products will resolve their problem when they don't know how to use them or willing to put in the time and take a class.
There is no magic bullet, training takes time patience and guidance from someone with experience. The perspective is to be aware of the audience asking the question. Most of the people looking for help have no clue that they are the reason the dog is misbehaving in the first place. I doubt any of us would ever let a dog get to this level, but it's not the dogs fault.
You and SRW have lots of knowledge on on how to train, in fact many on this forum go to great lengths to offer advice. Just saying even if you are down on positive training, remember that the people asking the questions are still blaming the dog. Just be aware that your advice can be taken out of context.
 

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Kristy
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I guess I have to point out that wiffle bat, healing sticks, whatever are adjustable. You don’t have to go full Babe Ruth with every swing. Just a tap is all it takes and for every tap you should be petting your pup with it many times.
I suspect you're thinking about this from the perspective of how you'd handle this at your house. The problem is that with a dog at your house, You have given the puppy a clear foundation of how to behave and what is acceptable and what is not almost from the very beginning. That isn't the case here and I strongly believe that while nothing but cookies and unicorns in training is not the right approach for training most Goldens, it is also not the right approach to not give the puppy clear instructions on what he SHOULD be doing and just start meting out consequences. I absolutely believe dogs need feedback on their behavior but they deserve to be shown the correct way to behave first. This puppy hasn't been given that information yet. If he was 9 months old and had been given strong leadership and obedience from week one, and was acting like an idiot, we might talk about bigger attention getting measures. But we're not. He deserves exercise and training to be a good dog and then if he's too big for his britches someone who is training in person with them could talk about a stronger hand. Remember your audience: most people on the internet are not going to understand a thing about proper application of a heeling stick or a whiffle bat, anyone who tries to go that route without proper supervision will most likely do more harm than good in the long run.
 

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Kristy
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.....As far as exercise... I try to walk him everyday for 30 minutes and sometimes we let him swim in our pool. I have taken him to the dog park a few times, but I feel like a lot of the older dogs get aggressive with him because he is so full of energy. Sometimes when the dog park is empty, Maverick will just run laps around it until he is tired. I am hesitant to let him off the leash in our yard because I know he will just go. There are a handful of dogs in the neighborhood which he will try and find. We have an invisible fence for part of the yard, but it is currently broken ( thanks to the hubbie although he keeps saying he will fix it). .... He's a beautiful dog and the trainer says he is smart. I think I just feel ill equipped on how to handle him.
I'm so glad that you are working with a trainer who has you helping Maverick learn to settle and teaching him what you expect of him. Some other good things you can teach are "leave it" - Here's a great video that shows how to do it. If you don't have a clicker, that's ok.
And teach him to make eye contact with "watch" or give you his "attention"
Kikopup "attention" videos are great
Here's a good one that is easy to understand on working on self control:

The keys to this are helping Maverick learn self control and what you want him to do and that's way easier if he's getting adequate aerobic exercise - just like you wouldn't expect students to focus and behave in a classroom without having sufficient time to run, jump and play and burn off energy - Golden Retrievers were bred to be working retrievers and it's not fair for us to keep them in a suburban setting (I am guilty of this too) and not finding a way to give their energy an appropriate outlet. Leash walking is not enough. Does Maverick like to play fetch? If so, start having him play fetch with a floating bumper in the pool - buy a special toy that you ONLY use to play fetch with. Here's a link to what works well, you can get them at hunting supply stores too gun dog supply etc. Amazon.com : Avery 2" Flasher Hexa Bumper Dog Training Dummy : Sports & Outdoors
Throw the bumper a few times and then stop the game BEFORE he gets bored. When it's over, put the bumper away. Put him on a long line if you have to at first to get him to come back and give you the toy. But he will eventually learn that if he brings the bumper to you that the reward is that you will throw it again. If he's mouthy and loves water, I am betting he will love the game of retrieving if you teach it to him. Eventually you train him to come sit back at your side and wait till you throw it again. Sound Beginnings DVD by Jackie Mertens is an excellent video on how to train this with a pup. Mertens: Sound Beginnings
Dog parks are no good for puppies as you've discovered. If you can go there on off times when it's empty, let him run. Otherwise, avoid like the plague. I never take my dogs to a dog park because you can't control the idiots there who aren't watching their dogs and way too much can go wrong. Put him on a long line and take him to a church yard or school ground to kick a soccer ball for him, organize a play date, have a portion of your yard fenced (I am not a big fan of electric fence but some people love them) but figure out how to get him 20-30 minutes of hard aerobic exercise that leaves him panting once a day.

Here's a great article interview with Dr. Nicholas Dodman on behavior that I love. Dr. Nicholas Dodman on Dog Behavior and New Training Techniques. He discusses how important exercise is as part of managing our dogs.

Mental work is just as important, keep teaching him new things, have one of your kids hide in the house and then take him on leash to find them. Reward with a treat or a toy. Teach him to "touch" your open palm - by holding a treat in it and tucking it between your fingers where they attach to your palm. Get to where he'll 'touch' with his nose and then you give a treat afterward. Eventually you'll have a simple command that you can give at anytime as a way to distract or give him a chance to do something he knows besides 'sit' or 'down'.

You could share the video if you'd like, I think we are all in agreement his shenanigans are just misdirected play.
I have no doubt that Maverick is both handsome and very smart. He is young and you will get through this. We would love to see photos of him. Maybe you'd even like to start a new thread documenting his progress because you know we will be wondering and very interested in keeping up with how well he's doing. You can absolutely do this, it's just going to keep you busy.
 

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Puddles
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The action of striking in frustration or anger with anything is never good advice
Who said anything about beating a dog in anger or frustration? You're bringing in your own preconceptions.
This was the quote from SRW "One thing you could start with is get a plastic wiffle bat. You can club him all you want with it when he misbehaves and it won't hurt anything except his feelings. He has to learn to respect you before you can accomplish anything in obedience training."
You and I may understand her point but someone with no training experience will not. This sounds like you are advising them to use something less harmful to beat / club the dog to vent their frustration and gain respect. Regardless if the wiffle bat hurts or not, it's a good way to get a pup with no impulse control to turn on them and this time it will be with intent. FWIW I have never had to club any dog I've trained or lived with to get their respect.
 

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This dog isn’t aggressive, it is frustrated, confused and untrained. I don’t hit my dogs, but I’ve used a small water squirt bottle to get a dog’s attention if necessary and they aren’t listening to me. Getting a dog’s attention is temporary and doesn’t teach them anything. Good solid training and off leash exercise work best. Dogs should never be allowed to attack anyone, and not the owner. Teach your dog to focus and to sit. Stop rewarding bad behavior. A dog doesn’t show the behaviors this one does unles it has accidentally been rewarded for it before.

Is your dog crate trained? Does he need to go outside when he lunges at you? If a dog did that to me, I would not distract and reward when he is distracted, he would be put immediately into a crate and ignored until he calmed down. He would also get a firm NO the second he acted out, or before if possible. You should be aware enough of him to know the signal before he acts up, and put him into a Sit or a Down until he is calm.
 

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Water boarding instead of beating, I might give that a try.:cool:
No, just a few drops in the face, nothing major. It depends on the dog. One of my dogs is a softer dog and gets almost no negative reinforcement. The other one isn‘t fazed by anything and can handle corrections or removal of rewards, and also needs more reminders than the other. That second dog is also very well trained, where the first one slides by.
 

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Do you know what a wiffle bat is?
It doesn't matter how flimsy a wiffle bat is, you do not beat a dog with that or a rolled newspaper, or anything else! What exactly is he supposed to be learning while you "club him with it all you want"? Did you miss the comment that this is a 23 WEEK OLD PUPPY?
 

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It doesn't matter how flimsy a wiffle bat is, you do not beat a dog with that or a rolled newspaper, or anything else! What exactly is he supposed to be learning while you "club him with it all you want"? Did you miss the comment that this is a 23 WEEK OLD PUPPY?
Yes, he is over 5 months old and needs obedience training now while it is relatively easy. Wait a few months and it only gets more difficult to change behaviors that are already a problem.
I suppose I should have been more delicate with my post. The fact that a wiffle bat won't hurt a dog does not mean you should beat him relentlessly with one "out of anger and frustration".
 

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Hey! My male golden is 23 weeks old and has become very aggressive with me for the last few weeks. I am struggling with him lunging at me and basically attacking me/biting me.
We were on a walk at the park tonight and he all of a sudden lunged and grabbed onto my arm, shorts, anything he could get his teeth on. He was growling and by the time I was able to contain him I was bleeding. When he does this, all I can do is grab his collar and try to keep him from latching on to me. Yesterday I took his Kong to refill and when I was walking away he came up to me and bit my rear and grabbed on to my shorts and started growling. He was not playing with the Kong when I took it. I experienced the same aggression yesterday after I took him out for the potty. He was on his retractable leash and lunged, growled, bit etc. I couldn't get him to stop and fortunately the neighbors dog came out and I was able to get Maverick off his leash and he went to play. I am very frustrated and frankly a little scared of this puppy. My previous golden was the sweetest thing ever and unfortunately had be put down in January at the age of six due to bone cancer. We just started dog training, but I feel like things are not getting better...just worse. I do not want to get rid of him because I think he has the potential to be a wonderful dog. I am just really struggling with how to handle this. He has most of his adult teeth now and is about 50 lbs. Advise would be great

Thanks so much.
Hi! We went through the same exact thing with our last Golden. His aggression started right around 6 months and, at times, seemed like a lost cause. We ended up hiring a behaviorist which wasn’t cheap but was totally worth it. After the first two hour session he was a completely different dog! It only took two sessions to fix his issues (plus continuous time and effort on our part). The behaviorist taught us that it was in fact our behavior/reactions that was fueling his aggression. I know every dog is different, but I would highly recommend investing in an animal behaviorist. Good luck!
 

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everything you are saying is an indication of a dog/puppy that wants to play. I don't know if you had experienced with other dogs but please know not all dogs are different. Some goldens are just a ball of energy and if you ask me, very very stubborn, and that's ok. Have you ever watch a video of an aggressive dog attacking a human? Trust me, you wouldn't be writing this post. What is happening here is you are dealing with a puppy full of energy that all he wants to do is play and play and play. Perhaps you want to embrace what you have and understand that he means no harm, he sees you as one of his littermates and that is ok. Trust me it gets better. I have never meet a golden that is broken and untrainable. They do get better. Start treating him with lots of love and lots of patience. Goldens really have a way to read you and if all he reads is negative, unfortunately you won't have much success training him, but know that goldens love to please their humans. Things don't always have to be so structured either. Maybe that's why he is being the way he is.
 

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Hi Nolefan! Thanks for the great reply. I'm a teacher, so Maverick is currently crated for an hour a day in the morning when I have some errands to do. He is crated at night from about 10:30-7:00 in the morning. We meet with a trainer one on one for an hour and a half each week. Today will be our third visit. She has us doing the unattached umbilical cord method you mentioned above. She also wants me to attach his leash to my belt for an hour a day so he realizes he is part of my pack. When I do this, he will get very stubborn and plop himself down so I can't move around. She has instructed me to wait it out which sometimes takes 15 minutes. I have been using the leash for chill time (where he is at my side and cant go far) during dinner or when watching tv. He is able to lie there for about 20 minutes. He sits and waits for his food and rings bells on the door when he needs to use the restroom. As far as exercise... I try to walk him everyday for 30 minutes and sometimes we let him swim in our pool. I have taken him to the dog park a few times, but I feel like a lot of the older dogs get aggressive with him because he is so full of energy. Sometimes when the dog park is empty, Maverick will just run laps around it until he is tired. I am hesitant to let him off the leash in our yard because I know he will just go. There are a handful of dogs in the neighborhood which he will try and find. We have an invisible fence for part of the yard, but it is currently broken ( thanks to the hubbie although he keeps saying he will fix it). My daughter videotaped the incident that occurred during our walk last night. I sent it to one of my friends and she felt like it was more of him wanting to play because after the lunge he was on his back and she said that was a submissive move. When I came down the steps this morning, he right away put his mouth on my shorts. I had him sit and wait. When my son came down, he put his mouth around his wrist. Again, I told him to sit and grabbed onto his leash until he was calmer. He's a beautiful dog and the trainer says he is smart. I think I just feel ill equipped on how to handle him.
We have a puppy around the same age. He has acted just as you are experiencing. We take him on two long walks and a couple of shorter walks each day. We also let him swim in a kiddie pool. This helps him burn some of the energy. On weekends he goes to obedience and agility training.
Buy a buster cube and fill it with kibble. He’ll chase it around while you get a chance to relax.
hang in there, it will get better.
 

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Hey! My male golden is 23 weeks old and has become very aggressive with me for the last few weeks. I am struggling with him lunging at me and basically attacking me/biting me.
We were on a walk at the park tonight and he all of a sudden lunged and grabbed onto my arm, shorts, anything he could get his teeth on. He was growling and by the time I was able to contain him I was bleeding. When he does this, all I can do is grab his collar and try to keep him from latching on to me. Yesterday I took his Kong to refill and when I was walking away he came up to me and bit my rear and grabbed on to my shorts and started growling. He was not playing with the Kong when I took it. I experienced the same aggression yesterday after I took him out for the potty. He was on his retractable leash and lunged, growled, bit etc. I couldn't get him to stop and fortunately the neighbors dog came out and I was able to get Maverick off his leash and he went to play. I am very frustrated and frankly a little scared of this puppy. My previous golden was the sweetest thing ever and unfortunately had be put down in January at the age of six due to bone cancer. We just started dog training, but I feel like things are not getting better...just worse. I do not want to get rid of him because I think he has the potential to be a wonderful dog. I am just really struggling with how to handle this. He has most of his adult teeth now and is about 50 lbs. Advise would be great

Thanks so much.
Your situation sounds so much like what we experienced with our Cooper, who recently passed. He was out of control as a puppy, and we ended up taking him to a “tough love” trainer, who gave us a different dog in 24 hours. The trainer used a correction approach combined with positive feedback. This was a right approach for Cooper, who had not responded to treat-based training or softer approaches. Cooper was a spirited dog who needed leadership, and in the absence of our filling that role, assumed it on his own. The root cause of his misbehavior was our failure to assume the alpha role in the pack. Do not give up on your puppy. He may well turn out to be a wonderful dog. If you would like, you can DM me.
 

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everything you are saying is an indication of a dog/puppy that wants to play. I don't know if you had experienced with other dogs but please know not all dogs are different. Some goldens are just a ball of energy and if you ask me, very very stubborn, and that's ok. Have you ever watch a video of an aggressive dog attacking a human? Trust me, you wouldn't be writing this post. What is happening here is you are dealing with a puppy full of energy that all he wants to do is play and play and play. Perhaps you want to embrace what you have and understand that he means no harm, he sees you as one of his littermates and that is ok. Trust me it gets better. I have never meet a golden that is broken and untrainable. They do get better. Start treating him with lots of love and lots of patience. Goldens really have a way to read you and if all he reads is negative, unfortunately you won't have much success training him, but know that goldens love to please their humans. Things don't always have to be so structured either. Maybe that's why he is being the way he is.
Couldn’t agree more!
 

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Your situation sounds so much like what we experienced with our Cooper, who recently passed. He was out of control as a puppy, and we ended up taking him to a “tough love” trainer, who gave us a different dog in 24 hours. The trainer used a correction approach combined with positive feedback
a “tough love” trainer
I bet that means wiffle bat maybe even E collar, the horror ;)
 
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