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Hi everyone!

We got our GF in december at 4 months old. She is now a lovely 5 month pooch and we couldnt be happier. We have attended puppy obediance training for all of february and we have our last class next Tuesday. Sam (her name) has learned many new things and seems to enjoy her training sessions in class and out. We have covered the basics: Sit, stay, heel, circle (circle on my righ to my left and sit). She listens like magic inside and she is still working on listening outside but does pretty good.

Our biggest concern is getting her to come! She will listen great inside. When we get outside it seems like her recall to come disappears. Its really hit and miss whether or not she will come and a lot of the time we find she runs away from us:nono: We dont chase her when she runs away, and we give lots of praise and a treat when she does.

There was some advice on this forum about getting them to understand that when you call them its not always when its time to stop doing something fun. We have started trying that and it seemed to work in the beginning but disappeared.

She gets adequate excerise, a good walk every day that mixes her on-leash (near or on roads with traffic) walking and off-leash walking (fields, walking trails etc) We spend everyday with her ( I work in town and am on call 24 hours, so I get to be at home while on call) so she is getting more than enough quality time spent with her.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated....sorry for the long speel!
 

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Beware of Nestle Purina
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You are not alone.

At this point you can still catch your puppy if you had too. Try catching an 80 pound retriever. Listens perfect when on leash including dragging a 100 foot lead but when he escapes goes deaf. He knows that as long as something is tied to his collar he can't get away. What can I expect he was raised by a foul before I got him. He gets tons of exercise. Venting sorry.

I don't know if I would allow off-leash time on trails, etc. til recall is established. I would only do off-leash time in a secure fenced area. Off-leash time on trails is an earned privilege not a right.

Wish I could help. Just wanted you to know you are not alone.
 

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I feel both of your pain. I think Darby has "thrown up the middle paw" to me a couple times when outside in the back yard.:D What really blows my mind is that, there is a well known kennel near me that trains hunting dogs. You can buy the pups at 12 weeks old, and they are already field ready to be off leash, retrieve, and COME BACK! WOW! That should be on one of the Discover Channel's "How They Do That":)
 

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Kate
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Our biggest concern is getting her to come! She will listen great inside. When we get outside it seems like her recall to come disappears. Its really hit and miss whether or not she will come and a lot of the time we find she runs away from us We dont chase her when she runs away, and we give lots of praise and a treat when she does.
The number one rule when you are teaching anything - do not ask your dog to do something if you are in doubt of them doing it and you are unable to reinforce.

Once your dog learns to blow you off (ignoring the come call), then you need to put a long line on and start training comes outside.

Remember - never ask for come if you are pretty sure she isn't going to come. If you ever go somewhere where you might need to recall your dog QUICKLY, then keep a long line on your dog.
 

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The number one rule when you are teaching anything - do not ask your dog to do something if you are in doubt of them doing it and you are unable to reinforce.

Once your dog learns to blow you off (ignoring the come call), then you need to put a long line on and start training comes outside.

Remember - never ask for come if you are pretty sure she isn't going to come. If you ever go somewhere where you might need to recall your dog QUICKLY, then keep a long line on your dog.
Great advice and very true!
 

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Dr. Rainheart
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I would advise getting into some more obedience classes. They can really help!
 

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One thing that helps with Tucker is that whenever he comes up to me (well not always, but most times), I give him a small treat. He was starting to blow me off at the dog park, so I started doing that, and now he's much better.

Another trick I was taught by a trainer is to create a special recall voice for you to use in emergencies. When training the dog to answer to it, use the highest-value treat possible so he has a strong association. She taught us to do that so we'd have a way to get out dogs out of dangerous situations. The call I use is the dog's name called out in a stream in a high pitched voice. Both my dogs will drop everything and come to that, but I don't use it all the time.

You might want to do more recall training in a boring environment and keep doing it until it's almost hardwired. Most dogs just get so distracted by what's outdoors that it's hard to compete. Other than that, I'm not sure what to offer. I'll be interested in others' comments. I'm always working on this with both dogs in various ways. It's one training command that needs constant reinforcement.
 

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I was going crazy with Sandy jumping all over everything and was finding myself getting frustrated trying to to teach her to behave so I was searching and ran across some videos on youtube that might help.

They focus on staying calm and teaching the dog to WANT to do what you want him or her to do... the videos are great and focus on using treats and a clicker... they have been working well with Sandy and I've only been watching them for a day...

the link to the channel is tab289's Channel - YouTube .. i don't remember the specific video I started with but I just watched them to get the method down and Sandy really took to it..

1 of the video series on the channel focus on the dog staying close to you when you're walking.. and I found it way easier inside than outside to get Sandy to focus, but it just took repeating over and over and over to get her to stop paying attention to the distractions.. hardest part is keeping other people from wanting to pet her, everyone loves golden retrievers after all! :)

hope this helps!

PS: I went out and bought a treat bag that hooks onto my belt and a couple bags of treats (which ended up being cheaper if i buy from amazon.com) which came to about $20ish
 

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Reward the recall - every time!! If she is doing well in the house, take her outside on leash, let her wander to the end of the leash, call her back, and reward, every so often surprise her with a 'jackpot' a handful of high value treats, fed to her one at a time. Release her. Repeat, repeat, repeat, rewarding every time, have a party - lots of praise, petting, encouragement and give her that handful every so often. You want her to want to come back to you. If you have a fenced yard, once she is doing well on leash, work with her off leash, if not then a longline can work well allowing you to add distance. Like training anything -make it easy for her to succeed(work up close) to begin with, then slowly increase the 'difficulty'.
 

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Thank you everyone! I like walking her off leash in the trails so we will try and work hard on creating the better recall in the backyard and on a long leash. This morning was extremely frusterating so I more determined than ever!
 

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Tracer, Rumor & Cady
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even though you "like to walking her off leash in the trails"......
Why-oh-Why would you give her more and more opportunities to practice behaviors you don't want and more and more opportunities for you to become frustrated?
 
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I just looked into the examiner.com two part training series and it gave me renewed hope!! I realize that her having crappy recall outside is our fault so now is our chance to fix it. Ive always envied the people who have the dogs who come instantly after being called and I hope Sam and I can form that relationship.

Well wish me luck everyone, thank you for the advice :)....if anyone should have more websites like the examiner.com for training tidbits I would love to hear of them
 

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Kate
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Thank you everyone! I like walking her off leash in the trails so we will try and work hard on creating the better recall in the backyard and on a long leash. This morning was extremely frusterating so I more determined than ever!

Put the long line on when you are going for hikes in the woods too. Train then too.

It is FUN to have a dog offleash while you are hiking or camping or swimming. But you will have plenty of time to enjoy that offleash time, after your dog is sound enough to come or allow you to go up and get him when you know he's not going to listen.

When a dog first notices and thinks about chasing after a rabbit - that's the time you call that dog to come.

After they've committed to the chase, you better have a rock solid come with him if you want to call. Otherwise, you have to hop into the bushes after your dog and physically chase him down.
 

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Dakota Katie River's Mom
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For me, the recall is the most important command of all, especially if you are away from home. I use two commands if out and they see something to chase, a 'leave it' and then 'come'. Until you know your dog will listen, I wouldn't let him loose on a trail, it's too easy for him to take off and lose him. One of the things I do to proof my dogs on recall is to put them on a long lead and have the kids bouncing a ball to the side about halfway to me. I start out close to me and gradually build the distance. I put distractions of all kinds between me and my dog. There's always a high value treat and lots of praise for a straight to me recall.
 

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Kate pretty much said what I was going to. Teaching recall is one thing, teaching it with distractions is another. Could save your dogs life one day.

One member mentioned that I had Fiona on a long line for a long time, which I did. Not because she did not learn and understand the commands, but hey, poof, there is a bunny out of nowhere. Can you say rope burn? ouch.

She got it pretty quick. She slams on the brake when I say a word. We have had to revisit the long line on occasion for a bit. Training is a life long thing.

You have a very young pup and only for a short time. Wait till they hit that bratty teenager phase in a few months and seem to forget everything. Patience!
 

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even though you "like to walking her off leash in the trails"......
Why-oh-Why would you give her more and more opportunities to practice behaviors you don't want and more and more opportunities for you to become frustrated?
I think everyone has a preference as to how they enjoy their time with their dog and thats mine. I have committed to finding alternative way's to train her recall. She has on leash and off leash walks.

Theres a couple methods mentioned on the examiner.com website I really like and am going to try, hopefully they work!
 

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Kate
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*shakes head* Okay... but you were asking how people train their golden retrievers to come. There are common sense methods that actually work to the point that within a year you will be able to enjoy walks with your dog off leash.

Please always keep in mind that rabbits will always be higher value than treats. As will other people. As will other dogs.

It takes time and training to get to the point where you can call your dog and have him come back to you despite that higher value THING calling him.

The other thing to keep in mind - and I'm just throwing this in because I do run into people with their dogs off leash at the lake or on hikes when I'm out with my dog.

If somebody's dog comes running up and gets in my guy's face, I'm usually watching that dog very carefully. If I see any reason for alarm, I'm either using a stick or my foot to protect my dog.

Lots of people enjoy having their dogs offleash because they feel it's like the epitome of dog ownership. Or it's a guy thing.

But there are dogs who - if they have no manners or obedience - should not be off leash. Even if they are friendly.

And these nuisances are the reason why there are so many leash laws now.
 

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I was going crazy with Sandy jumping all over everything and was finding myself getting frustrated trying to to teach her to behave so I was searching and ran across some videos on youtube that might help.

They focus on staying calm and teaching the dog to WANT to do what you want him or her to do... the videos are great and focus on using treats and a clicker... they have been working well with Sandy and I've only been watching them for a day...

the link to the channel is tab289's Channel - YouTube .. i don't remember the specific video I started with but I just watched them to get the method down and Sandy really took to it..

1 of the video series on the channel focus on the dog staying close to you when you're walking.. and I found it way easier inside than outside to get Sandy to focus, but it just took repeating over and over and over to get her to stop paying attention to the distractions.. hardest part is keeping other people from wanting to pet her, everyone loves golden retrievers after all! :)

hope this helps!

PS: I went out and bought a treat bag that hooks onto my belt and a couple bags of treats (which ended up being cheaper if i buy from amazon.com) which came to about $20ish
Great info here! I have watched all his videos, and it blows me away how his tecniques get great results. I would love to see this guy have a TV show. Making the pup come between him and the chair for heeling purposes was remarkable. Thanks for sharing the info:)
 

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Great info here! I have watched all his videos, and it blows me away how his tecniques get great results. I would love to see this guy have a TV show. Making the pup come between him and the chair for heeling purposes was remarkable. Thanks for sharing the info:)
Agreed, I've adopted his method to get the puppy to do other things and it's working great! I actually, within a few hours, got Sandy to turn a complete 360 while standing on my scale without leaving the scale, which is the precursor to heel. Last post of his was a month ago, I hope he keeps posting videos.
 
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