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Hi...I only introduced myself a few days ago. I am on the hunt for an older golden female in the Chicago area and have not been having much luck. We would like an older, calmer GR as we have small children and just feel that would be the best fit for our family.

Well, I got a break today. Someone responded to my Kijiji wanted ad telling me that they knew a person selling an older golden girl with his phone number. Although I thought that was a bit odd...I called. LOL!

The man lives in WI about an hour and a half north of Chicago and is selling the GR's for his brother who is ill. They are seven years old, have had litters, as they were breeders and they are not spayed. He also told me that as far as he knows, they are completely healthy but not housebroken :( (neither is my one year old shih tzu so what am I complaining about??)

He is selling them for $150 each.

I was wondering what questions I should ask regarding these dogs. Does anyone know the repercussions of having been bred (not sure how much) or any other advice for me? Hopefully, we will be taking a ride up tomorrow morning to meet these girls!
 

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My concern here would be if they are not housebroken, they are probably outdoor dogs. I would be very careful about whether these dogs have been exposed to children.

Try to get the vet records of the dogs to find out what kind of breeder he was.
 

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This sounds familiar...
"breeders". That cranks my chain, sorry. My assumption is that these poor girls are no longer cranking out the litters, so they are being dumped. I doubt very much that they are housebroken, or even socialized. Hopefully, at the very least, they've detached the conveyor belt that was connected to their bottoms for so many years. :mad: I also doubt very much that they have undergone any health screenings for hip/elbow dysplasia, cardiac disease, or CERF eyes. (If so, they should READILY and immediately show you the certificates.) At seven these girls deserve to have good homes after being puppy machines, but you need to know that the likelihood of them living healthy, lives for more than a few years is slim, and that cna be very hard on young children.

Sorry to sound like the voice of doom, but I've seen more of this than I care to count.


***It seems that I recall a very similar, if not identical, situation not too long ago, in the same area, with the same story. I'd have to look in the archives to find it.
 

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Well, I recently adopted a 7-year-old 'breeding' dog, and she is a wonderful, sweet, happy little girl. She's smaller than the breed standard (probably because her growth was stunted by being bred too young), and she's suffered from chronic ear infections (now under control). She was housetrained but needed a bit of refresher training. But she is very well socialized and loves people.

I would try to get an idea of how the dogs were kept (in the yard, a kennel, etc.), how often they were bred, health problems in the past (including vet records if you can get them), behavioral problems, how do they react when you see them, how do they look, etc. Ask lots and lots of questions.
 

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"breeders". That cranks my chain, sorry. My assumption is that these poor girls are no longer cranking out the litters, so they are being dumped. I doubt very much that they are housebroken, or even socialized.
That was my thought as well. They did their service to the mill and now they want to scrape a few last dollars out of them.
I'd ask how many litters each has had. What kind of environment they lived in. If they have been around children.
 

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Oh nuts! I was sort of excited to finally get "a break" in the search although I knew the situation was not ideal! I'd be very interested to see if you can find the other case similar to mine and to see if there was a resolution!

Maybe I should just go to a breeder and get a puppy but I really feel like an older golden would be best.
 

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Peggy:
Have you tried to find a GR rescue group in your area. Sometimes they get older and already trained goldens that the owners just cant keep due to a move or health problem. A rescue group may be able to help you find the Golden that will fit in well with your family. Any good rescue organization asks a lot of questions regarding the type/personality of the dog you are looking for so they can help you find a match.
Just a thought...
Anywho about this particular "breeder" I would be wary. Not house trained puts up a few red flags in my opinion... Whatever you decided keep us posted please...
 

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Can you go and meet the dogs? Maybe take a trainer with you to evaluate and temperament test them? I wonder if a GR rescue would help you. These dogs may wind up in a bad place and a rescue may step in to help you out. I'm not sure they can though.
 

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Oh nuts! I was sort of excited to finally get "a break" in the search although I knew the situation was not ideal! I'd be very interested to see if you can find the other case similar to mine and to see if there was a resolution!

Maybe I should just go to a breeder and get a puppy but I really feel like an older golden would be best.
I agree with earlier posts about them not pushing out the pups anymore so the "breeders" are just trying to make one last buck off them. Nothing makes me more sick then puppymills. :no: My foster girl is a former puppymill dog. She was very afraid at first but is making major improvements. So don't just discount the dog because they will probably not be the typical golden when you meet them. Also, please consider a local rescue, sounds like you could give a great home to a dog in need. Also curious as to where the dogs are locateed as I live in SE WI myself.
 

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Yes, I have checked rescue and our local GR rescue does not adopt to families with children under the age of six. My youngest is 2.5. Petfinder, it seems, rarely has purebred golden girls...why would anyone ever give up a beautiful girl! :)

I am now weary of even going to see these dogs in WI. He said I was the first phone call because he doesn't know anything about computers and he put an ad in the paper that will run on Sunday. Somebody will get them right? I'm thinking I'm going to wait now...
 

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Yes, I have checked rescue and our local GR rescue does not adopt to families with children under the age of six. My youngest is 2.5. Petfinder, it seems, rarely has purebred golden girls...why would anyone ever give up a beautiful girl! :)

I am now weary of even going to see these dogs in WI. He said I was the first phone call because he doesn't know anything about computers and he put an ad in the paper that will run on Sunday. Somebody will get them right? I'm thinking I'm going to wait now...

Please don't rule them out sight unseen. They could be breeder dogs with all the problems other have mentioned. They could also be family pets who were bred and be very nice dogs.

Please go meet them at least. You will be able to tell by their behaviour if they have any socialization with people or are afraid of people. That would give you an idea of their history. Do ask for vet records and ask lots of questions about them, but give them a chance. You could be giving a wonderful dog a good home.
 

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While there is nothing wrong with older dogs, I would strongly suggest looking for a puppy since you have kids. You have no idea how this dog's temperament would be around kids and you really can't be sure of the history. You never know if the person selling them is 100% honest. If you go with a puppy, it will be more work, but definitely worth it in the long run. Plus, with a 7-year-old dog, she has already lived half of her life and you have no idea how many more years she will be around. Just think how devastated your kids would be when she passes. Those are just my thoughts.
 

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If you dont go to see them, you might contact some of the rescues in the area and let them know about the dogs so they can try to get them. Then at least you would know they are safe and not going to be given to another breeder. Those puppymills dont care about the health of them. Dont give up. And maybe if you help the rescues they will possibly be able to help you. Good luck.
Also the idea of having a behaviorist to go with you to meet the dogs and give you an idea of their temperment.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Just a quick update...I emailed our local GR rescue with the story of these two girls...hopefully they will take interest and go get them and find them the perfect home...I will continue my search!

Thank you all so much for your advice! It is much appreciated!
 

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Good luck, Peggy!

I found out about Lily on Save-a-Pet.com, now www.adoptapet.com. It seems to have some smaller rescues represented that I did not find on petfinder.com. You may find a dog at a rescue that is not specific to goldens that has a more lenient policy regarding children (Lily was at a small rescue that mostly had harder to adopt mixed-breed dogs - she's perfect in almost every way and was turned in to them by someone who knew the co-founder).

Also, get the word out to friends that have goldens that you are looking. Now that I have goldens, you'd be amazed how many times I hear about friends of friends needing to rehome a golden. You could also check craigslist, as I know some folks on here found their golden that way. And lastly, keep checking back with the rescues who have turned you down for having small children (and go to their adoption events if they have them, offer to foster, make a donation in person). Who knows, with the economy the way it is there may come a time where if they know you and they are having trouble finding good homes, they may remember your persistence and find the perfect dog for you (e.g. history of happily living with small children) and bend the rules a bit.
 
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