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Hi again! :)

So if everything goes as planned, we may expect our second Golden puppy in June.
In another thread I asked advice on a male or female, but now I have other questions as this will be our first time owning two dogs at the same time.

Do you have any tips or advice concerning training, daily schedule with an adult dog and puppy (we have a good routine now, so I don’t know if it’s better if the pup just goes with the flow of our routine?), when you have to work and when they need to stay alone for a bit (do you leave them alone together or separated, if separated how did you do it?), how to do with our walks (apart or together), sharing toys, and of course the introduction (taking Ella with us when we’ll pick up the pup, or on neutral ground? I also have two cats), etc..

Our daily schedule, during the week when we go to work is like this:
  • I wake up at 5 AM, go for a short walk with Ella and by the time we get back home hubby is also awake and trains for 10mins with Ella while I get ready for work. Then we switch and I play with Ella while hubby gets ready. When we’re both ready I let her out in the garden one more time, we go inside in the kitchen (she sleeps in there) and I get her KONG and a little biscuit, I close the babygate and give her her KONG + treat and say “See you later, be a good pup”. We leave the house at 6:30 AM
  • At lunchtime my parents or brother come by to let her pee/poo in the garden and play a bit and then leave again
  • Hubby and I come home at 4 PM (we work both at the same job), we go for a 1-hour walk with Ella, we come home and I start cooking, doggy rests a bit or plays with hubby, then we all eat dinner and after dinner we do another 10min session of training mixed with play or sometimes we just play search games.
If the pup’s here, I think it’s best I keep Ella’s morning walks, while hubby plays with the pup? So that they’re both tired? Then comes the question, do we leave them alone together, or do we put the pup in a playpen? We have a doggy camera so that we can keep an eye on her (and the devil cats) while we’re at work (she mostly sleeps). If something should happen, my parents live about 15mins from us and they’re both retired so always available. We only had to call them once, because of a human mistake (mom left cat kibble in a plastic bag on the counter, she forgot our cats could reach it), but otherwise nothing bad has happened yet. Is it a good idea to give them both a KONG before leaving, or this could cause trouble?

The weekends are all about Ella. We go for long walks in the woods, take her everywhere with us where it's possible and spend a lot of time with her. We do plan everything in function of our dog.

Also, Ella tolerates A LOT. When my parents in law’s dog (miniature Poodle) stays over for a weekend, it really takes a long time before Ella shows the hyperactive Poodle that it’s enough. She does this by either cornering him (without any growls or teeth, she just guides him to a corner to loom over him), and one time she dropped a paw on him. But she never growls, show her teeth or doesn’t snap. So for that matter I think it’s better to pick a puppy who is a bit laidback? I don’t know if this is good or okay or not good that Ella tolerates a lot. I know that when she plays with other dogs, that she avoids chocolate Labs and Border Collies, but always plays with all kind of Goldens expect the pushy ones.

She also has no problem sharing her toys with the poodle, but we have an open basket with all her toys and Nylabones. She does show some resource guarding when she finds a little stone or walnut in the garden (we’ve been training a lot on her resource guarding random things, but when there’s another dog around it’s a bit more difficult). IF a situation like this should happen, hubby and I thought about taking one dog each (I take Ella in the garden while hubby goes play with pup inside), so that the pup wouldn’t see this behavior and take it over. Don’t know if this is a good option? Maybe we’re overthinking WAY too much, but it’s all new again for us.

I probably forgot a few things, but it would already help a lot if you guys got any advice for us on this, or even extra advice/tips that I haven’t mentioned!
 

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You mentioned leaving pup in a play pen, I recommend crating your pup anytime you are away from the house such as at work.
 

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You mentioned leaving pup in a play pen, I recommend crating your pup anytime you are away from the house such as at work.
Oops, forgot to mention to put a crate in a playpen or against the playpen, so that the pup could move a bit too. Or you'd recommend just crating?
 

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Oops, forgot to mention to put a crate in a playpen or against the playpen, so that the pup could move a bit too. Or you'd recommend just crating?
Some pups can or will climb the playpen and get out so you may want to keep this in mind.
 

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For the sake of safety, you should keep them apart when you're not there, at least until the new pup is grown and you are 100% sure they get on well. Dogs don't necessarily get on well with one another. When we got our new pup, our resident dog literally hated him - hate is not too strong a word - and would attack the pup every time the poor thing came into the room. It was several months before they started to get along. Some dogs don't like puppies; some dogs don't like adolescent dogs (because they are too energetic or unruly); etc. I'd recommend crating the puppy when you're not there.

Best of luck!
 

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For the sake of safety, you should keep them apart when you're not there, at least until the new pup is grown and you are 100% sure they get on well. Dogs don't necessarily get on well with one another. When we got our new pup, our resident dog literally hated him - hate is not too strong a word - and would attack the pup every time the poor thing came into the room. It was several months before they started to get along. Some dogs don't like puppies; some dogs don't like adolescent dogs (because they are too energetic or unruly); etc. I'd recommend crating the puppy when you're not there.

Best of luck!
The kitchen is big enough, so I'll put a crate there so that they're still together, but not loose together. Is it recommended to give a towel or a small plush to the breeder for the smell, and a week before we pick up the puppy, put the towel in the crate so that our dog can get used to the smell already?
 
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