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Discussion Starter #1
So my golden girl Lily and I just got the news yesterday... she has pretty severe hip dysplasia. She's taking it pretty well (luckily she doesn't really seem to have any pain or anything yet) but I of course feel insanely guilty and very angry... at everyone. You, me, that guy on the street... it's everyone's fault of course ;) But seriously, I really want to inform the breeder about this, but don't really know how to go about it without getting really angry and probably accusatory. I just want her to know that her breeding stock (most likely the dam from what I gather of the pedigree) is passing on this gene.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Kate
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First of all, your golden is beautiful.

Call or email her breeder and let her know that Lily has dysplasia. If you have the xrays saved on your computer (ask your vet for a disk or have them email the xrays if they can) or even borrow the xrays and bring them over to the breeder to show her.

Some breeders require OFA grading before they believe the vet. I'm going to guess from the pic that your dog is only about a year old, so you won't be able to get that done right now.

^ This isn't so much to get money or sympathy back, but it is to inform the breeder that this happened. If your dog is the only one in the litter to have hip dysplasia, odds are they are not going to do anything differently. Because this happens, even with the most careful breeding practices.

If multiple dogs in the litter have been diagnosed with hip dysplasia, then odds are they will do something differently.

Either way, they need to have that information.

I would go by email if you are really upset.

Is Lily a surgery candidate or did the vet recommend treating with supplements and controlled exercise?
 

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First let me say BUMMER! Now some more constructive advice. Sending an email to the breeder might be good. You can edit it before sending. Include a scan of your documentation (is this your vet's diagnosis or ofa's?) if possible. Also realize that HD can crop up among lines that have had ofa clearances for many generations, and your breeder may be just as upset at the news as you are. The fact that your dog doesn't appear to have symptoms is great news! There are many things you can do to support her that will help minimize arthritic change, which is the part that would cause her the most discomfort. I DO understand how you must be feeling, and am sorry for this sad news.
 

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Thanks to you both. Firstly, this is the vet's diagnosis (who is certified by OFA and PennHip); he showed me the x-rays and I agree, they're so bad there's really no point in sending them to OFA. It was very obvious, even to me, and I have virtually no medical background. But as you said, it is good that she's not showing symptoms, and the vet said that since she's not he didn't think we needed to discuss surgery just yet. I think I am going to try Daqium (I don't think I'm spelling it right - it's the injectable) to try to prevent any more damage. Luckily she is quite trim - more so than in the photo now - and gets plenty of exercise so that will work in her favor.

I agree that email will be the way to go; more control that way! I will try to make it as matter of fact as I can.

As I alluded to, I am just angry in general, not necessarily angry at the breeder; I know these things can happen. But logic is not really ruling at this moment!
 

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Kate
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You were right, Megora; in that pic she was only a year old. Now she's three. Do you think I should make the effort to submit to OFA anyway?
I think that's up to you...?

If you have the xrays and they are OFA quality, I think it's only another $40?

I hope Max's Mom posts here - or possible PM her? She uses adequan with one of her dogs in addition to other supplements.
 

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This is a quick response to let you know I saw this post. I am responding from my phone but hope to be on the computer later and can elaborate more later.

First of all let ms tell you I know how you feel. I cried like a baby when Teddi was diagnosed. There is life with HD. As for the breeder, a good breeder will want to know, a less reputable breeder won't care. Not their problem. Approach your email from the direction of informing. Other pups in the litter could also be affected. As for OFA just my opinion please submit. If everyone holds back the less desirable information how good is the database? Teddi was 1 when she had her total hip replacement, I can't get her OFA. I do plan to put her in K9 maybe I will do that next week.

I will send you supplement and adequan info in a bit. Need to get the dogs out before it gets much hotter.
 

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So sorry to hear about the hip dysplasia, I know exactly how you feel, our previous goldens both had it. Sarah who was 11 when she was diagnosed was on supplements and our vet also has an under water treadmill, and Sarah also used that and that seemed to help. Our vet is a holistic vet, and she also recommended chiropractic treatments, that also helped quite a bit. We had her for another 2 years before she died, she was suffering and we had her put down. The same thing with Abby, she was 13 when we had her put down for the same reason. Our goldens were alot older than yours, so I would like to think she has alot going for her. I did not write this to upset you, just wanted to let you know there are other options out there.

Flash forward, we now have another golden, her name is Maya, she is 12 weeks old, our breeder has had everything checked out as far as hips, eyes, elbows, very good. Our breeder also insists (she had a contract made up) that we report anything like this to her.

Take care

and I hope everything goes well for your dog.
 

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As a breeder, I would want to know. Also as a breeder, I can tell you bad things DO happen to good breeders. I also know that as a veterinarian. Hip dysplasia is multifactorial and not just a simple dominant or recessive trait... so clear parents can produce it. I raise all of my own dogs on dasuquin w/MSM and fish oil. I have used adequan in my first golden and felt it was helpful. My girl who had hip dysplasia had an OFA clearance at 2 years, then was dysplastic at 44 months. I started her on cosequin ds at that time.... she went on to get her UD and only needed one more RE leg, when cancer took her at almost 12. She was still jumping in the show ring!! She came from more than 5 generations of hip clearances with an excellent here or there. I fear elbow dysplasia more than hip dysplasia.
 

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Oh, I realized that you contacted me by email! Her pedigree appeared to me to have very little in the way of clearances.....
 
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Just popping in this thread too - Summer is 18 months old now and was diagnosed with bilateral HD when she was 8 months old. She was symptomatic from about 4 months :( We went through the whole process of finding a reputable breeder, blah blah. It still happens..

She's on half-yearly Cartrophen injections (1 course = 4 weekly shots), Arthrix Plus (glucosamine, chondroitin and MSM) and Arthro-ionX homeopathic supplements. She swims twice a week, short walks twice a day and romps off leash once a week.. I would say her pain is well-controlled at the moment even though her Xrays too were obviously messed up (hips not even in the socket) and she had symptoms at a young age.

Our vet has some theory that her worse hip (left) hurts less because the ball is completely out and not even rubbing in the socket whereas there is more abrasive action on the right side. Who knows?

Feel free to PM me about anything - though I definitely don't have as much experience as Maxsmom since Summer didn't have the surgery.
 

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Thanks to you both. Firstly, this is the vet's diagnosis (who is certified by OFA and PennHip); he showed me the x-rays and I agree, they're so bad there's really no point in sending them to OFA. It was very obvious, even to me, and I have virtually no medical background. But as you said, it is good that she's not showing symptoms, and the vet said that since she's not he didn't think we needed to discuss surgery just yet. I think I am going to try Daqium (I don't think I'm spelling it right - it's the injectable) to try to prevent any more damage. Luckily she is quite trim - more so than in the photo now - and gets plenty of exercise so that will work in her favor.

I agree that email will be the way to go; more control that way! I will try to make it as matter of fact as I can.

As I alluded to, I am just angry in general, not necessarily angry at the breeder; I know these things can happen. But logic is not really ruling at this moment!
I am so sad and sorry about this news. It is great that she is trim and not showing signs.

Breeders can sometimes be quite skeptical of vets. When my pup was diagnosed with bilateral ED, the breeder really needed to see to believe, and OFA is the most convincing. There is an argument to be made that getting it on the database will help others in their breeding decisions too. I hope your breeder refunds some of the price of your golden or helps with vet bills or shows sincere caring in another meaningful way.
 
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I'm back. There are several options with HD depending on the dog. I also belong to an HD list, and many there were able to manage their dogs severe HD with just supplements and proper exercise. Surgery is a option but I would hold off if I could. Teddi was diagnosed at 9 months. She had been symptomatic before we just didn't see it. Puppies are not supposed to be broken. By 10 months she was in so much pain she needed 2 previcox a day just to feel well enough to eat. So surgery was our only option. I want to say she is doing very well, we only operated on her right (worst) side and she is a happy dog. Now 4 years old.

Supplements. Get on them if you are not already. Can NEVER hurt. Glucosamine/Chondroitin you have a lot of options out there. However not FDA regulated so some do not have the ingredients they say they do. I also find the cheaper the supplement the larger the "tablet" and the higher the dosage. For instance I had Maxine on one the tablets were the size of Ritz crackers, and she was supposed to get 4 a day. She did not like them so it was a pain to get them in her. I personally (and a lot of vets recommend) Cosequin DS by Nutra Max. Same company that makes Dausquin mentioned earlier. Dausquin is a great product, I think a little stronger than Cosequin. I plan to put Teddi on that when I think she needs a bit more help. Nutra Max GUARANTEES their products ingredients. They are a bit more expensive but the tablets are small and my dogs only get 2 a day. A bottle lasts a long time. They like them too, even my finicky eaters. I also supplement with MSM daily. I was doing 1000 mg a day, I recently upped to 2000 mg. I get my MSM at GNC at the mall.

Salmon oil, it is a natural anti-inflammatory, also good for skin and coats. Again falls in the "can't hurt" category.

Adequan, this is a great product but not cheap. There are two types, one injected directly into an animals joint, the other an intramuscular injection. I am on the latter, the muscle shots. Adequan says it hydrates the joints, and surrounding tissues. It slows the breakdown of joint fluid, so it protects the joints better. I give my injections monthly and so far so good. It can be given more often if needed. There is no harm in this medication but it does briefly burn when received. I have two dogs on it Teddi and Belle. Belle does not seem to care about the shot, Teddi does not like it. So I don't think it hurts a lot, Teddi is just a drama queen. My vet showed me how to do the injections so I give it myself at home. I do think my dogs are more comfortable as a result of the Adequan. I KNOW my horse got more supple when he was on it. This is an option, if your dog is not 'experiencing pain' right now you could wait and start later.

Teddi has additional issues she too has suspected elbow dysplasia, I can't afford to get her an MRI or CT Scan to fully diagnose. Her hip was more than I could afford. We are managing her elbows, and as a result of compensating her whole life, she also has spondylosis in her back. More or less arthritis. She is not on any NSAID's on a regular basis yet, and I hope to keep her off as long as possible. A couple other options I plan to investigate before NSAID's, one is acupuncture. I have heard there are good results with acupuncture for pain. I might also investigate injecting her joint directly. Not sure about that yet.

Lastly... and I can not stress this enough.... weight control. My surgeon said we must keep Teddi between 60-65 pounds. She is a tall dog (24") so that is skinny for her. However any extra pounds at all on a dog with bad hips (or elbows) increases the wear and tear on the joint. So if at all possible get Lily to the skinny side of normal weight and work to keep her there. Exercise is great for them, swimming is FANTASTIC. You want to keep the muscles strong around the hip, to help the dog manage. However everything in moderation, over doing it will get them sore really fast too.

I don't mean to bombard you with information, but this is just basic stuff. No magic here. Easy to do maintenance, and it could help Lily immensely.

Again, you should contact your breeder just to let them know. They may care, which I hope whether there is any compensation or not, knowing you have their support is extremely helpful. Or if you are like Teddi's breeder, they will never respond and you will never hear from them again. I worry often about Teddi's siblings. I wish I knew.

Sorry for your diagnosis, but it does not mean Lily will have a bad life. A lot can be done to help her have a great life. And if surgery is needed, the FHO (femoral head osteotomy) is a great procedure, many dogs have a long pain free life after. We went with the THR (total hip) and though it was a long and stressful post operative recovery, now I don't worry much at all, Teddi runs, jumps, plays, and pretty much gets to be a dog. The THR is a VERY expensive procedure, the FHO is not cheap but much cheaper than the THR. Just food for thought.

Good luck!!! If you have any questions, I am no expert, I have just been living through it. :wavey:
 

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Thanks, LJilly28. I don't even really want any sort of compensation from the breeder (as you know here in Maine it's buyer-beware) but I just would want her to take a better or at least a second look at her program.

Thanks for the support and advice everyone!
I am pretty sure I met you doing Rally(?) because your dog looks sooo familiar and I have a memory of it, but I could be wrong!

Did you take her to Todd Gauger in Norway?
 
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Lily

Lily is just gorgeous and if your vet is not contemplating surgery yet, then I would take it one day at a time. Many years ago we adopted a 2-3 year old Female Samoyed that we later found out through xrays at the vet had, "One of the Worst Set of Hips he had ever seen!" We ended up having FHO surgery on one of Munchkin's hips - she did very well. Munchkin lived to be 12 years old and was walking right up to the end of her life.
Femoral Head ostectomy is not as serious a surgery as TOtal Hip Replacement.
Google
 
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Hello:)

In my own opinion, there's really no pleasant way to deal with this situation particularly with the breeder.

But there's always hope. Here's a video about a dog who was suffering from severe lameness and was helped with proper management and joint supplements. I hope this video will help you find the ray of light at the end of the tunnel. Glycanaid HA Factor Case Study - Before and After Video
 
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