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Hello, I'm new here and new to golden retrievers also. I'm looking for any advice on taking in a 6-7 month old GR. A friend is having to re-home the GR for personal reasons and the timing works well for us to take him in as we recently lost our yellow lab of 15 years. I'm meeting the pup tonight for the first time.

Here is what I know:
The GR was purchased from a reputable breeder and has AKC papers. He's updated on shots, is house broken, and knows basic commands.

Any advice to help with a successful transition for the the pup is much appreciated.
 

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If the pup was bought from a "reputable breeder"....then the breeder will have it in their contract that the pup must be given back to the breeder, or the breeder has first rights for the pup coming back to them. The breeder should be notified….to where the pup is going.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Interesting. I haven't asked about a contract but regardless, I don't see the pup going back to the breeder. The family still wants to see the pup from time to time and can do so if we take it in.

I'd love some advice on transitioning if you or anyone has some to give.

Cheers!
 

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bigblackdog is right. I don’t see that as being your responsibility. If the contract states that, mine does, it’s up to the original owner to deal with.

I’m sorry about the loss of your long time companion. You haven’t forgotten what to do with a young dog.

This pup will be coming to you in the teething landshark phase. I wonder if that’s one of the reasons the pup is being rehomed. My first golden who was wonderful could be a bit of a jerk at 6 months. Puppy proof a space. I would also review house training by going out with the pup and showing him or her where you want their bathroom place to be reinforcing with lots of praise and a cookie. Patience, praise, cookies and just being calm consistent and without judgement. Hopefully this pup is crate trained. If not I would consider that too. Remember this will be a huge adjustment for a young dog.

Enjoy having a dog in the house again! You haven’t lost your puppy chops!
 

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If the pup was bought from a "reputable breeder"....then the breeder will have it in their contract that the pup must be given back to the breeder, or the breeder has first rights for the pup coming back to them. The breeder should be notified….to where the pup is going.
I would be sure to check if this is in the contract. It would be a shame to become attached to this pup just to have to give it up to the breeder due to a contract stipulation especially since you recently lost your lab of 15 years.
 

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Goldens are very adaptable. The puppy should merge into your family smoothly. As others have said, I would work on reinforcing the commands already known and begin teaching new commands you’d like the dog to know. I’d also take the puppy to potty on a leash. Heck, you could even use it as an opportunity to teach the puppy to potty on command. A dog that will potty on command is an enormous convenience. Congrats on the new puppy!
 

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I guess my question would be, why does the breeder need to know if the original owner has to rehome.?
A good breeder should want to ensure that the puppy hasn’t been dumped in a shelter. What sort of AKC papers does the puppy have: full or limited registration? If it’s full, I would question how reputable the breeder is. If it’s limited the breeder may have in the contract that they want to know when the dog is spayed/neutered so knowing where the dog is may be important to them. Knowing why the puppy is being rehomed could be useful information to the breeder. For example, if the puppy is being rehomed because it’s aggressive or has some health problem is something a good breeder should want to know. Lastly, a good breeder should want to know that the puppy is going to a safe environment and to a new owner who can properly care for the dog.
 

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Check the contract.... quality breeders keep track of their pups more than you seem to realize. It is a legal agreement and as posted before would hate to see your family have to suffer another loss.
As far as age the pup will adjust just fine but remember this is a puppy and will need lots of time to learn the rules of his new home. 6 month old pups require lots of your time, find a class if you have never trained a dog before and this will make the adjustment much easier. Make sure you have a crate :)

EDIT: having AKC registration does not mean this pup came from a reputable breeder, simply means the parents were also registered.
 

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I guess my question would be, why does the breeder need to know if the original owner has to rehome.?
When a pup is purchased from a Breeder, there is a contract which stipulates that pup must be returned to the Breeder if the owner can no longer care for it.

Contracts are a binding legal document...... to protect yourself, check with these owners to see if they have a contract. If they have one, don't return the pup to the breeder, and you take the pup, you could be looking at a legal mess.......

For your sake, ask the current owners if they have a contract.
 

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I'm no expert, but I think I'd hold off for a bit on the family seeing your dog during the transition. It seems like it would be confusing and cause angst to the dog. I may be anthromorphizing.

Have you asked your friend about the puppy as far as any training is concerned? It could be a mixed bag as far as what you are getting as far as behavior is concerned. If you're up to it, lots of training, love and time should get you to where you want to be.

I'd want to know the breeder and see the dog's paperwork and get the vet records. I'd also be researching the breeder and checking health clearances. This is in your best interest. As was mentioned, contracts usually say to notify the breeder and he or she has say so as to what occurs with the dog. I wouldn't think a responsible breeder who has entrusted a puppy to an owner would want the dog passed around willy nilly. The breeder may be fine with you as an owner, but they make these contracts for the well-being of the dogs they've bred via much love, time, research, and energy.

Oh, and you also need to take into consideration if you have children or other pets in the household as far as adjustment is concerned. If you change his food, make that adjustment gradually or he'll have an upset tummy. I'm sure you will do great if you've already raised a dog. Goldens are big family dogs and want to become part of the family and be around you just like anyone else in the household. They don't tolerate being left alone for long periods of time well -- either in the house or yard.

I'm sorry about your yellow lab. I'm glad he had a nice long life, but I know we always want them to live longer. Having lost my Golden Retriever last year, I know it leaves such a void. We just got a new puppy and has brought lots of smiles to our household.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the suggestions! I've confirmed that the breeder has been engaged and all is clear for us to take him into our home. The breeder has been researched and has great reviews online and social media.

He has been trained and knows basic commands sit, stay, down, etc. He's house broken and uses a bell on the door to notify the current owner when he needs to go out.

He is not crate trained yet so we will need to work on that.

We are meeting the pup today and plan for him to stay a night or so first to see how things go. They're such a good breed and I think he will do just fine with the adjustments.

Wish us luck and keep the suggestions coming!
 

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Thanks for the suggestions! I've confirmed that the breeder has been engaged and all is clear for us to take him into our home. The breeder has been researched and has great reviews online and social media.

He has been trained and knows basic commands sit, stay, down, etc. He's house broken and uses a bell on the door to notify the current owner when he needs to go out.

He is not crate trained yet so we will need to work on that.

We are meeting the pup today and plan for him to stay a night or so first to see how things go. They're such a good breed and I think he will do just fine with the adjustments.

Wish us luck and keep the suggestions coming!
Be sure to share photos of your new addition!
 

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I hope it all goes well for you and the pup. It may be obvious but keep in mind he may be more active and excited for a few days before settling in. When we visit somewhere new even my normally calm Rukie is a bit of a pain. The contrast between an older dog and a 6 month old puppy is huge so try not to make comparisons. Like others have said most Goldens want to please, they just start out clueless and exuberant. Best wishes.
 

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Thanks for the suggestions! I've confirmed that the breeder has been engaged and all is clear for us to take him into our home. The breeder has been researched and has great reviews online and social media.

He has been trained and knows basic commands sit, stay, down, etc. He's house broken and uses a bell on the door to notify the current owner when he needs to go out.

He is not crate trained yet so we will need to work on that.

We are meeting the pup today and plan for him to stay a night or so first to see how things go. They're such a good breed and I think he will do just fine with the adjustments.

Wish us luck and keep the suggestions coming!
If not already done..I would ask for a written release, if there was a return to breeder clause.
I am sure that a person selling something of value under a contract would have no problem giving you a release. One never knows what will happen in the future, and best of luck!
 

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One thing to keep in mind is that it MAY take the pup quite a while to really settle into your home, so be prepared to be patient. I recently bought a 3 year old who had lived his whole life with his breeder... It was probably 4-6 weeks before he stopped acting anxious every time he woke up to find himself in our house instead of his old home, probably 6 months before I had most of his basic manners in hand and was somewhat confident that he had learned the rules of our household, and probably almost a year before I really felt he considered us "home." So... patience and understanding will go a long way with any new dog. Be prepared for a little backtracking on things like housebreaking and manners. Be firm, but fair and consistent... and if he disobeys or does something "naughty," remind yourself that he's just a baby in a strange new place. I'm sure in time he'll learn the ropes and I hope he'll be a wonderful new additional to your family!
 
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