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Hi there! I know this is an extremely old post, but I, too, would love to know how your pup is doing! I posted on here about a year and a half ago - and I can say with relief that our Tucker, now almost three years old, is much much better now - although he will always be high- energy. And we have learned over time how much freedom to give him and when to draw the line, which has been a huge part of the learning process for us. I sure hope you've seen improvement too! Happy Spring!
 

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Hello, we have a 17 month old Golden Retreiver and all he does is bite my daughter when she tries to play with him. I dont know how to get him to stop. Other than the biting he is a really good dog. Some people tell me its because my daughter is at the same level size as him. Also,any suggestions on how to get them to stop digging in the yard? Our yard looks like a construction site with all the pot holes out there. LOL
 

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I also have a naughty 1 year old retriever who bites and jumps. When he does it in the house I have noticed its usually only when he needs to poop! He usually has to walk or run for a few minutes before he can actually do his duty.
When he hasn't been out long enough he tries to bite his leash off and nip at my hands so I don't take him home so I try to make sure he has a long enough walk/run/play. I think as one person mentioned, we expect more of them because they are older but they are still naughty puppies! ?❤
Good luck!
 

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Hi.. my goldie Charlie will be a year old at Thanksgiving and sounds just like JJ. Has anyone heard about JJ over the years and if anything worked?
 

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Hi there! I know this is an extremely old post, but I, too, would love to know how your pup is doing! I posted on here about a year and a half ago - and I can say with relief that our Tucker, now almost three years old, is much much better now - although he will always be high- energy. And we have learned over time how much freedom to give him and when to draw the line, which has been a huge part of the learning process for us. I sure hope you've seen improvement too! Happy Spring!
i know your post is 6 years old, but if you see my question, I’d love to hear your response. When you got your dog, were you looking for high spiritedness? Did the breeder choose him for you? I ask because we are waiting for a pup from a litter that will soon be born. The breeder specifically asked questions regarding the temperament that we were looking for. After reading so many posts about wild dogs who bite, I’m feeling nervous.
 

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Don't worry- this behavior is largely correspondent to how much training you invest.
Put in a lot over time and get a reliable well-behaved dog. Remember it is usually two steps forward, one back.
 

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..... we are waiting for a pup from a litter that will soon be born..... After reading so many posts about wild dogs who bite, I’m feeling nervous.
I can't emphasize enough that what Prism posted matters : "....this behavior is largely correspondent to how much training you invest." If you haven't found a good place to attend obedience classes with your puppy, it's not too early to do so. You can do a google search for "dog training club" or "obedience Club" or contact your regional AKC club or Golden Retriever club (grca.org) and ask for assistance from GOlden people to get referrals. Clubs are terrific ways to get a good, affordable class. The members teach the classes and you can join and they are generally reduced in price. Plan on being enrolled in classes for the first year or two of owning your Golden, especially if you've never really trained a dog before. Attention to daily exercise and obedience will make your life with your new puppy much more enjoyable.
 

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Not sure who is responding to who but I just posted a few days ago about JJs behavior. Our Charlie has similar behavior as to jumping and biting us. He has had training and still is training. Charlie has been being trained since he came home by us. He's also been to puppy and Obedience 1 and will attend Obedience 2 in January. He jumps and bits us like we are litter mates. It doesn't matter what we do or try he doesn't stop. This is my 3 goldie and never had one act like this. Covid-19 hit and we weren't able to socialize him. I believe this has alot to do with it but still can't get it corrected. I would love any suggestions. Thanks
 

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A few times with Rukie I have just had to bolster my resolve that I am not going to tolerate this and I WILL make you stop. For the jumping we practiced a lot in puppy classes where we tied the dogs up and rotated approaching each dog with treats and only petting and rewarding when they were in a sit. I never let anyone approach him and pet unless he was in a sit. We also let the leash loop on the ground and stood on it so the dog can't jump up. We would turn our back to him any time he came for attention with jumping. Have you tried letting him drag a leash at all times and stepping on it to prevent the jumping? You may want to have a trainer come to your house and help with this since the longer it goes on, the harder it is to correct.
 

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Don't worry- this behavior is largely correspondent to how much training you invest.
Put in a lot over time and get a reliable well-behaved dog. Remember it is usually two steps forward, one back.
Thanks for the response. I went down the forum’s Behavior Issues rabbit hole the other night and all I can say is WOW! I believe we are working with a very reputable breeder located in northwest WA. We had a long chat and I feel confident that he will do his best to match us with a puppy AND THEN, like you said, it will be up to us to train/raise the puppy into a well behaved dog. We know, from raising 3 children who are now adults and upstanding world citizens, that training a puppy will take lots of time, effort and even some tears. We also know that the outcome is well worth the work!
 

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I can't emphasize enough that what Prism posted matters : "....this behavior is largely correspondent to how much training you invest." If you haven't found a good place to attend obedience classes with your puppy, it's not too early to do so. You can do a google search for "dog training club" or "obedience Club" or contact your regional AKC club or Golden Retriever club (grca.org) and ask for assistance from GOlden people to get referrals. Clubs are terrific ways to get a good, affordable class. The members teach the classes and you can join and they are generally reduced in price. Plan on being enrolled in classes for the first year or two of owning your Golden, especially if you've never really trained a dog before. Attention to daily exercise and obedience will make your life with your new puppy much more enjoyable.
Thanks for your suggestions. I didn’t know about looking into clubs. I am trying to learn as much as I can before bringing a puppy home. I’d rather be proactive in training than reactive.
 

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........... I am trying to learn as much as I can before bringing a puppy home. I’d rather be proactive in training than reactive.
Super smart, a new puppy is like bringing home a new infant, if you're doing it right, you'll wonder what you ever did with all your free time ;)
Use the search feature at the top and look up old threads on good books and videos, websites etc. there are some really terrific resources available and having video to watch can be so helpful if you've never trained a dog before. We also have lots of threads on great things to buy to make managing a puppy easier, good toys etc. IT's a lot of fun to look through all the ideas people have. Also, can't remember if I suggested it but there is a wonderful facebook group called "Life of Rune" hosted by a lady who is an amazing human and terrific Golden trainer. She documents, with videos, the exercises and ideas she has been using to train her current pup to be a therapy dog. She is so supportive and you can back track through all her old videos, they are under the "Units" section and organized by age - you can also just scroll back to January 2020 to see the beginning posts. Kind of fun to see them.
Here's the link : Life with Rune
It's worth the time:
 

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Super smart, a new puppy is like bringing home a new infant, if you're doing it right, you'll wonder what you ever did with all your free time ;)
Use the search feature at the top and look up old threads on good books and videos, websites etc. there are some really terrific resources available and having video to watch can be so helpful if you've never trained a dog before. We also have lots of threads on great things to buy to make managing a puppy easier, good toys etc. IT's a lot of fun to look through all the ideas people have. Also, can't remember if I suggested it but there is a wonderful facebook group called "Life of Rune" hosted by a lady who is an amazing human and terrific Golden trainer. She documents, with videos, the exercises and ideas she has been using to train her current pup to be a therapy dog. She is so supportive and you can back track through all her old videos, they are under the "Units" section and organized by age - you can also just scroll back to January 2020 to see the beginning posts. Kind of fun to see them.
Here's the link : Life with Rune
It's worth the time:
Thanks so much for sharing the Facebook page. I'll check it out!
 

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"Sit" is the first command a dog learns in basic obedience. Any dog that knows it can be instantly brought under control.
"High spirited" is just an excuse for poor training. Attend a retriever field trial, you will see dozens of "high spirited" dogs and none of them will be jumping on or biting people.
Time outs don't work (on kids or dogs).
Praise good behavior and reprimand bad behavior.
Maintain your standards for behavior 24/7.
It isn't rocket science.
 
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"Sit" is the first command a dog learns in basic obedience. Any dog that knows it can be instantly brought under control.
"High spirited" is just an excuse for poor training. Attend a retriever field trial, you will see dozens of "high spirited" dogs and none of them will be jumping on or biting people.
Time outs don't work (on kids or dogs).
Praise good behavior and reprimand bad behavior.
Maintain your standards for behavior 24/7.
It isn't rocket science.
Thanks for your response. I too thought training a dog couldn't possibly be rocket science and then I saw the hundreds, maybe thousands (??) of posts on the Behavior Issues forum. Being a novice dog-person (won't even be bringing home my puppy until March), I was freaked to say the least.

As a parent of adult children and a newly retired teacher (elementary students and then a teacher-of-teachers in classroom management), I know that training your kids and your class is all about consistency, even when it would be easier ON YOU to look the other way. I can tell you that students are just waiting for that defining moment that tilts the leadership dynamic. They actually don't want the shift, but they have to test you. Once they are satisfied that you are the leader and will always be the leader everything settles into a calm environment of mutual respect, trust and safety. To achieve this relationship takes hard work and is minute by minute work for quite a while. I believe it is difficult for most people to sustain the consistency, or they don't understand that it's not just a, "say it once and it's learned behavior"...
maybe that's why the abundance of posts!?!?

Hopefully, I'm going into this with my eyes wide open and with an understanding that training will be my new full-time job (being retired during a pandemic dumps a ton of time in your lap) and until I actually get my puppy, I think I'll focus more on the training forums and less on the behavior issues forum. Like I said at the beginning, reading through some of those is enough to make you run the other way. 😂
 

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I know that training your dog is all about consistency, even when it would be easier ON YOU to look the other way. I can tell you that dogs are just waiting for that defining moment that tilts the leadership dynamic. They actually don't want the shift, but they have to test you. Once they are satisfied that you are the leader and will always be the leader everything settles into a calm environment of mutual respect, trust and safety. To achieve this relationship takes hard work and is minute by minute work for quite a while. I believe it is difficult for most people to sustain the consistency, or they don't understand that it's not just a, "say it once and it's learned behavior"
Great summary of what it takes to train a dog!
 

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We had this same problem, totally random and annoying lol. Our trainer came out and observed and now things are much much better.

First of all don't play with him while sitting on the ground. It is most likely just over stimulation. You need to try to pin point when he is getting to the breaking point and try to stop play before that happens, pet him, calm him down and then resume playing once you are back to a place where he has self control again.

When he does mouth you, say "ouch" with your deep voice, fold your arms and turn your back to him (don't walk away). He might still jump a few times but 9 times out of 10 he will eventually offer a sit. When he does this, praise, praise, praise!! Have a few treats in your pocket for this instance.

You want to keep play time structured for now. Also if you see him getting to his "losing it" point start with some training before he can get there. Work on some basic commands to gain his focus back.

These things have worked SO well with Koda and she was quite the mouther.

If you want to play rough with him, add a cue word. My husband likes to play rough with her sometimes, I do not. So he says "Koda, wrestle" and she knows that means she gets to play with him in a different manner but she never does it to me anymore. And if she tries, I fold my arms and she quits.

I felt like it was never going to end and now it has! :) Good luck!
Thank you for this. It's really helpful. Who was the trainer you used to help you please?
 

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Thank you for this. It's really helpful. Who was the trainer you used to help you please?
We had the same exact issue and were recommended Adrienne Farricelli at Brain Training 4 Dogs. She's been a CPDT-KA certified dog trainer for 10 years and is the BEST. Her modules are super helpful and straightforward and honestly totally worth it in my opinion. Here's a link to her website: Brain Training 4 Dogs
 
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