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I just recently adopted a beautiful girl golden, and she is the sweetest thing! Only problem of course is that we don't know what her actual name is, and she doesn't come when we call her anything. I was wondering what the best way to go about teaching her a new name would be? I don't seem to be having too much luck!


ALSO, I know it is very common for dogs to pant a lot, but dear Molly just seems like she's never NOT panting, and she snores at night, which does not bug me, but I was just wondering if she may have some kind of over heating problem, or maybe a sinus problem, where she's panting because she is having trouble breathing through her nose?

And last question. This ones easy hehe I was wonder what the recommended time between baths for a Golden would be, and if you have any suggestions as to the best most hypo-allergenic shampoo would be.


Thanks for you time!
Beki
 

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Congrats! How old is she?

For the name, start calling her the new name and if she even just looks at you give her a treat. Repeat over and over!

If she's panting so much that it is concerning I would check with your vet. panting can also be from stress. Put a bunch of ice packs on the floor, throw a towel over them, have her lie down on it and gently and quietly massage her for a while. If she's still panting a lot I would ask the vet.

For bathing, I recommend every 2-4 weeks. We probably do every 6 weeks cause it's so hard to bathe such a large dog, and I'm lazy...
 

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Jackie has giving you some good advice. How long have you had your girl? I am thinking she may be judged stressed. So others here who have rescued or foster will have some better insight. As for baths, it really depends on the dog. With Tucker, he does not get smelly as we brush him frequently. He gets a bath typically every 6 to 8 weeks when he goes to the groomer. In the summer we will bath him more often if he has been swimming. We are lucky because Tucker has one of those coats that the dirt and mud just brushes out after he dries. Not all goldens are that way. Also, having them on the right diet will really help their coat. Sometimes it takes trial and error to find the best food. We just lucked out food wise and tried what my sister uses with her dogs, and Tucker does great on it.
 

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Panting can equal stress - what I was thinking. Just keep that in mind - especially if she's eating, drinking, acting fine. This should lessen over time and if it comes back full force in a new situation, it would be a good tell to let you know how your dog is feeling.

Max is a panter though. He gets a good pant on every night before bedtime for at least 10 minutes if not longer. I think he finds it comforting or relaxing or something. Maybe your dog does too - just thought I'd throw that out there!
 

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I agree that the panting is most likely stress related but if you are really worried check with your vet.

Start right now training basic obedience and use her new name, clicker training can really help her learn her new name fast too. Call her name and the moment she looks at you click and then treat. Use her name to teach her to sit, down, stay and come. She will learn it in no time.

I bath them once a month unless they are very dirty or in the summer is when they are in the pond swimming. I rinse them after every swim and bathe them once a week.

Enjoy your new girl and remember she is learning how to act around you as much as you are with her.
 

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Thanks everyone! This was all very helpful! I think I'll go buy a clicker tomorrow. Molly is about 3-4 years old according to the vet =) and she is panting less now. Now just trying to get her to walk beside me when we go on walks. She likes to take the lead and pull me, so I have been just stopping and making sure she knows that I am the one in charge, and then when she listens she gets a treat. She is also getting treats when she responds to her name, and sits and lays down. Thanks again!
 

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Thanks everyone! This was all very helpful! I think I'll go buy a clicker tomorrow. Molly is about 3-4 years old according to the vet =) and she is panting less now. Now just trying to get her to walk beside me when we go on walks. She likes to take the lead and pull me, so I have been just stopping and making sure she knows that I am the one in charge, and then when she listens she gets a treat. She is also getting treats when she responds to her name, and sits and lays down. Thanks again!
That's great! I would encourage you to take her to a good obedience class as well once she's settled in.

Have fun!
 

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Just wanted to thank you so much for rescuing Molly!! I'm sure that she fit right in. There is only one thing wrong though. We definitely need to see pictures of your sweet girl!
 

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When I work to teach a puppy's name I sit on the floor (usually in the bathroom as it is a small space with less distractions).....
I toss a small tasty bit of food...as they are eating I call their name sweetly....they look I show them another piece of food in my hand...as they come to eat it I bring it up to my face to encourage eye contact (as they approach I lower my hand and I say, Name-Take-It) stroke them gently and tell them they are such a good dog)...I then toss another piece of kibble...Rinse & repeat about 10x per session... a couple times a day....

The only adult dog that Ive ever had to teach her name was Lexi and the same process was used...
 
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I think it's incredibly important to the time to teach the name as a sound that means "Give me eye contact because I've got something awesome for you!" I think we forget how important training the name is. If you can associate it powerfully with good things and fun games, you have a better chance down the road at developing difficult skills.

For example, half the battle in getting a recall during a heavy distraction is having a dog who's used to having his attention interrupted by the sound of his name.
 

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Thanks for rescuing your girl!

Tons of good advice on this thread! I just wanted to chime in and say it doesn't matter what her actual name is, you can start calling her anything you want (using the tips in posts above) and she'll pick it up quickly. My family rescued a border collie when he was 2-3 years old and it took him half a day to learn his new name. Ranger had been called "Bear" for a week and still didn't respond to it when I adopted him; it took him maybe a day before he started looking at me when I said "Ranger". My new foster puppy was called Rango for a month or two, but then I had to change it to Scout because Ranger/Rango was too confusing for the dogs. He learned his new name in about 1-2 days. So don't worry about changing it! Lots of people change their dog's name when they get adopted, even if the old name is known. Fresh name, fresh start. And is just me or does it seem like a lot of dogs that end up in rescue or in shelters have basic pet names like Spot, Tiger, Goldie, or the latest names du jour like after a sports team or player?
 
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I just wanted to chime in and say it doesn't matter what her actual name is, you can start calling her anything you want (using the tips in posts above) and she'll pick it up quickly.
So true. Dogs set absolutely no identity in their name. They either have associations with it (positive or negative) or they don't. If you start positively teaching attention with a brand new name, your dog will LOVE being called it.
 
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