Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good Morning!

I've done a ton of research on this and am looking for any and all possible solutions. I love my pup Walter more than anything and I'm the parent, so the blame for poor behavior starts and ends with me.

I'm really good about avoiding trash that he'd like to pick up and eat. But every once in a while he gets ahold of something nasty in his mouth. The first two times this happened, he bit me. It's not his fault!

I realized that trying to fish it out with my hands is a bad idea. It reinforces the value of his "street treasure" and he works even harder to swallow it. So, I've been hand feeding all his meals, working on "leave it" and "drop it," and trading for treats. It's been working!

But this morning he picked up something irresistible and it was large and gross. I tried to dangle as many treats as possible and he refused to let go. It looked at the very least, like something that would cause some nausea and at worst, could cause an emergency visit to the vet. Again, he bit me.

I realize nothing happens in a straight line with pups. It's often 2 steps forward, 1 step back.

Any experiences with this? Will he outgrow it? Do I just need to stay the course and keep working the training?

Sorry--just frustrated after all the progress we've been making. (Walter below)
Dog Plant Dog breed Collar Carnivore
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
I am following this post! My 4.5 mo puppy tries to eat just about everything. We live in the city so you can only imagine the things on our sidewalk… It has caused us an emergency vet visit after eating something toxic, we still do not know what he got. I have been trying to keep his leash tight and have eyes like a hawk while we go for walks, lol. He has gotten so smart and fast which makes it tricky. I am hoping it is something he grows out of…. If anyone has any ideas….I would love to hear them!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Kristy
Joined
·
10,359 Posts
Glad to see that you're taking responsibility for your puppy's behavior - some of this is definitely training deficit but honestly, some of it is the temperament and personality of the dog. Obedience training is key. Setting your dog up for success by doing the absolute best you can in paying attention and avoiding this kind of garbage is also helpful. More high value treats that are special for walks and teaching them to trade at home is also good. Use the search feature at the top of the page and search old threads for "puppy eating rocks" or "puppy eating things he shouldn't" "Resource Guarding" etc. Here is an excellent trainer who can get you started working on the "Leave It" command. Kikopup Teaches "Leave It"

Daily obedience work, both on and off leash is incredibly important. If you have trouble remembering, always practice for a few minutes before meal time, this keeps you doing something at least twice a day. 5 minutes is all you need at a time. Also try looking up/googling the protocol "Nothing IN Life Is Free" and use that as a basis for managing your dog. Makes a huge difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Another thing to do: when out in the walks, scan the ground/grass with your eyes before your dog reaches there. This has saved us from loads of junk our dog almost got hold of.

Oh, when we 1st got our pup (2 months old), he also picked up all kinds of junk, especially plastic waste. But we were quick and firm about it, by stopping dead on tracks, putting our fingers into his mouth, prying the jaws open and firmly pulling the trash out. While this experience wasn't pleasant for our pup, that was the lesson of it. Meaning that when he picks up trash or other forbidden items, he will get bad experience out of it (we take it from his mouth). This has taught our pup not to pick up trash anymore. Now (3 months old), he freely walks past or even steps on plastic waste, without picking it up. He may sniff it a bit but that's all he now does with trash on the ground. :)

Sorry--just frustrated after all the progress we've been making.
5 months old = early teens, where dog will challenge your teachings and rebels against it. Normal thing for all dogs. And it's passing matter as well. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,567 Posts
I too had this scavenging problem with my younger one - especially tough when doing nighttime walks. Tough to scan and see potential problems in the dark even with a flashlight. Yes - Leave It and Drop It commands are KEY to managing it. Luckily, with training and just plain growing up, most pups outgrow this very unpleasant habit. The biting is an added challenge. It's hard to give advice from a distance and not seeing it, but I would not back off taking it out of his mouth if he refuses to "drop it" providing he understands that command.
There are just too many dangerous outcomes from swallowing something that he picks up outside on a walk.
If a firm "DROP IT" doesn't cause him to do so immediately, I would be pulling it out of his mouth wearing leather gloves if necessary. You cannot let him learn that biting works. My assumption is that he is biting your hand when you remove items. If he is biting your arm or elsewhere, enlist the help of a trainer.
Just keep up the training program. Goldens generally want to please you and the daily training strengthens the bond you have with each other.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top