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It's a very sad week, my family had to return our cute 3 month old Golden, all because of my mom's job, which will probably appear in a few months.

Basically it is that he would be alone for about 4 hours at a time in the morning a day, and we felt bad and returned him back to the breeder. I feel so sad, I miss him so much, all the memories of him being naughty, and innocent are coming back. :(
 

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So sorry... that has to be heartbreaking. I am sure Teddy's well being was the main concern.
 

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I'm sorry this decision was made. Most puppies love to have 4 hours of quiet time. But I'm sure your mom did what was best for the family and for Teddy. Glad you bought him from a reputable breeder who would take him back. (((((hugs)))))))
 

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Yeah, everything was made for the best decision for him. By 4 hours, I mean at a time, he would be alone for 4 hours. Then my dad would come home to take him out to pee/poop, eat, and play a little. Then my dad would go back to work and leave him in his crate for another 4 hours until my brother and I came home. We decided it wasn't good for Teddy to be alone all that time.
 

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Sorry to hear your family decided to return the puppy. 4 hours though isn't all that much time, especially when you consider the fact that he would only have to be in the crate until he was housebroken and not his entire life. My pup, JJ - 15 weeks - loves his naps. He sleeps from 7:30am - 11:30am/12pm, 1pm - 4pm, 8pm-9:30pm and then 11pm-5:30am. Whenever he's awake and out of the crate, he gets every minute of our time. He does nothing but play when he's wake, so his naps are something he looks forward to. That's not to say though that Teddy likes to sleep as much as JJ. If you miss him that much, maybe you should talk to your family and reconsider....?
 

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Yeah, everything was made for the best decision for him. By 4 hours, I mean at a time, he would be alone for 4 hours. Then my dad would come home to take him out to pee/poop, eat, and play a little. Then my dad would go back to work and leave him in his crate for another 4 hours until my brother and I came home. We decided it wasn't good for Teddy to be alone all that time.
I'm sorry you had to return Teddy. I'm not judging you or your family, but the schedule you described in your post sounds like the average day for a lot of puppies, including my own over the years.
 

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That's how long Maddie was left alone when we first got her. She's had house privileges since July and has done just fine. We do have a doggie door & a fenced in yard.
 

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Well, the thing is, my dad might have meetings, or might have to go to other places for his work. So he'll be left alone for 8 hours. What will we do then? I can still take him back if we know what to do with future problems.
 

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I think 8 hours+ is a lot. I think you made the right decision. It does hurt though.

Maybe you could rescue a kitten one day. Then a dog when your schedule work out differently one day.
I disagree about it being the right decision. There are at least 2 solutions to this problem: puppy daycare or a dog walker who can come once a day. This whole situation coud have been thought out in advance. I'm just glad the pup is still young enough to bond with another family. I may sound harsh, but there are just days when I get tired of people using the convenience excuse for not owning up to the responsibility of bringing a dog, puppy, baby, whatever into their lives.

Stepping of my soap box...
 

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Well, the thing is, my dad might have meetings, or might have to go to other places for his work. So he'll be left alone for 8 hours. What will we do then? I can still take him back if we know what to do with future problems.
I think you and your family made the right decision. 8 hours or more is way too long for a pup to be left and it is better to realise this sooner than later. Best wishes.
 

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I disagree about it being the right decision. There are at least 2 solutions to this problem: puppy daycare or a dog walker who can come once a day. This whole situation coud have been thought out in advance. I'm just glad the pup is still young enough to bond with another family. I may sound harsh, but there are just days when I get tired of people using the convenience excuse for not owning up to the responsibility of bringing a dog, puppy, baby, whatever into their lives.

Stepping of my soap box...
First let me say that I agree 100% on principle. I think most of the biggest problems in this country today could probably be traced back to a society with way too many people who won't take responsibility for themselves or their dependents whether it's a child or animal. And it's frustrating.

However, I think most of us forget or may never have realized what a shock it can be to bring home a golden puppy. (I know this is speculation, but....) If the parents haven't ever had a dog, they probably had no idea the amount of work required to do the job correctly. Even people who research carefully and have done it before are usually taken aback at the energy of a golden. I don't want to hurt anyone's feelings, but while it maybe ok to crate a puppy for 8 - 10 hours a day, it's hardly ideal. Especially if the family then comes home and has to take kids to practice or a job or other activities. It leaves very little time to exercise or train and if the dog isn't a priorty it's probably not getting done. Although a dog walker or doggy day care is an excellent idea, these resources cost money and in our current economy I understand that it may be more than the average family can swing if they have kids. Training classes can be pretty costly too. Yes, all this should be taken into consideration prior to purchasing a puppy, but I do think our current economy has made some huge changes in a lot of our lives.


I would like to argue that the problem probably lies with the breeder selling to this family in the first place. This poster didn't have a fenced yard and stated a few months back that the parents weren't able to put out the money to fence it even partially. I suspect that they aren't experienced dog owners if they would consider bringing a high energy golden puppy home to family situation with extremely busy parents and no fence to help with excersise and potty training. More careful screening probably would've revealed that this wasn't the ideal home for that puppy in the first place. And yes, I know it's possible to have a dog without a fence, I've done it myself, but it was before I had kids. My dog was my family, but even then it was a big responsibility.


The reality is that (strange and wrong as it may seem to us) most people in the world simply don't place a dog as a high enough priority to make the sacrifice needed to give it a really good life in this situation. I have to say I am just really, really glad that they were responsible enough to do what was REALLY BEST for this puppy and let the breeder have him back.
 

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I disagree about it being the right decision. There are at least 2 solutions to this problem: puppy daycare or a dog walker who can come once a day. This whole situation coud have been thought out in advance. I'm just glad the pup is still young enough to bond with another family. I may sound harsh, but there are just days when I get tired of people using the convenience excuse for not owning up to the responsibility of bringing a dog, puppy, baby, whatever into their lives.

Stepping of my soap box...
I agree with you about the solutions that could work, but that assumes the family is committed to making it work. I think that if a family is ready to give up a puppy after a month with it because they underestimated the work and their own commitment to him, it's probably best for the dog to be returned. If they're not willing to adjust now, that dog is almost certainly not going to get enough attention and training in the long run.

The beauty of getting a dog from a great breeder is that you sign a contract that states you can (and must) return the dog to the breeder if you can't take care of him. The breeder can then care for the dog properly and place him. It's very different than a shelter dump.

So in this situation, it's probably better for the dog in the long run to be returned to a caring breeder and placed with people who can do better by him.

If this were my dog, I'd move heaven and earth to make sure I could keep him and do right by him. But it doesn't sound like this family has put him that high on the priority list.
 

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@nolefan - Well said.

@Derp - 8 hours straight is to long for a dog that young. Some will argue it's to long for a dog at any age, but neither here nor there, if the dog can't be let out, played with, and fed mid-day, it's not a good idea to have him and your parents made a good decision. While dog walkers come in handy for this, it's not always financially possible. Right now, you are the biggest priority in your parents life, and adding a dog into the mix may have just been to much to handle.
 

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I'm sorry you had to return Teddy. I'm not judging you or your family, but the schedule you described in your post sounds like the average day for a lot of puppies, including my own over the years.
Yup. That's how both myself and a co-worker had to deal with our puppies. I ran home over lunch and spent a half hour or so with him. Granted not everyone has the flexibility to do that.

I disagree about it being the right decision. There are at least 2 solutions to this problem: puppy daycare or a dog walker who can come once a day. This whole situation coud have been thought out in advance. I'm just glad the pup is still young enough to bond with another family. I may sound harsh, but there are just days when I get tired of people using the convenience excuse for not owning up to the responsibility of bringing a dog, puppy, baby, whatever into their lives.

Stepping of my soap box...
Neither of which are economically feasible for the average person. We spend ~$1,000/month on daycare...so yeah...throwing hundreds more at a dog sitting or walker wasn't happening.

You never know what their individual situation is. I know that many people run into one or more bread winners losing their job, having to take another job (which is less flexible), and that completely throws off their family dynamics.
 
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