Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner

21 - 36 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,926 Posts

·
Jamie
Joined
·
467 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
Thought I'd update you all - I picked up Rio a little over two weeks ago. He is a stellar puppy and I'm having a blast with him. He has been exposed to a lot already in his young life including - three airports, two plane rides, water, ducks, handling class and rally run-thrus (as an observer), horses, lots of people, lots of dogs (only gets to interact with a couple that I trust), hunt club training, and to our field trial training grounds. He travels really well in the car and tolerates his crate at home.

He's super smart and picks up on things incredibly quickly. He's very food motivated and works for his kibble most of the time. At home he is a wild man, but in new environments he is a silent observer, which I think is fantastic. He's definitely more vocal than my other two, but its mainly when he's playing or if he thinks he's being unfairly crated lol!

For now we are following Connie Cleveland's performance puppy primer and Jackie Merten's Sound Beginnings. I thought it was awesome that the puppy Connie uses in these videos is the same Nate that competed at the NARC last week.

We started puppy training last night at a place my friend teaches at. She knows we are ahead of the game and lets me work on whatever I want and just use the high distraction environment.

He's a big boy too, I thought I'd be getting a smaller field dog but he is tracking with Fisher's growth as a puppy and he ended up at 73lbs. Lastly, he's super handsome :)
 

Attachments

·
where the tails wag
Joined
·
13,359 Posts
Oh, he is precious :) congrats again!



Thought I'd update you all - I picked up Rio a little over two weeks ago. He is a stellar puppy and I'm having a blast with him. He has been exposed to a lot already in his young life including - three airports, two plane rides, water, ducks, handling class and rally run-thrus (as an observer), horses, lots of people, lots of dogs (only gets to interact with a couple that I trust), hunt club training, and to our field trial training grounds. He travels really well in the car and tolerates his crate at home.

He's super smart and picks up on things incredibly quickly. He's very food motivated and works for his kibble most of the time. At home he is a wild man, but in new environments he is a silent observer, which I think is fantastic. He's definitely more vocal than my other two, but its mainly when he's playing or if he thinks he's being unfairly crated lol!

For now we are following Connie Cleveland's performance puppy primer and Jackie Merten's Sound Beginnings. I thought it was awesome that the puppy Connie uses in these videos is the same Nate that competed at the NARC last week.

We started puppy training last night at a place my friend teaches at. She knows we are ahead of the game and lets me work on whatever I want and just use the high distraction environment.

He's a big boy too, I thought I'd be getting a smaller field dog but he is tracking with Fisher's growth as a puppy and he ended up at 73lbs. Lastly, he's super handsome :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
404 Posts
Yes! My wife and I have had field bred Goldens since 1999. Our first one we trained on initial obedience and then worked with a pro trainer to get her up to the AKC Junior Hunter level. My initial purpose on this was to have a good hunting dog for waterfowl and some upland game. I have two adult sons and we all like to hunt birds.

After her initial training was done, I decided to run her in a local hunt test, JH level! I spent a ton of time reading, asking questions, watching a test, etc. I recall my hands were shaking on our first test, I made a few mistakes, but our girl nailed it and wow was that a rush! I was hooked...

Jump forward to 2012 and when we had three field bred Goldens. One male and two females. Both the male and first female were JH and I was determined to make our newest pup become a fully trained to hunt waterfowl. To me, that was trained to the SH level, as blind retrieves are common on waterfowl. We got her to the SH level and topped that off with a WCX.

Jump forward to today, our two older Goldens past this year, both from cancer! I really regretted getting two dogs so close together! Losing one is tough, losing two was a much harder.

But in November we decided to get one more field Golden and this time take her/him all the way to MH, if the dog is capable. Working with our trainer we can determine if the dog has the potential to be a MH. I have learned that even if you have a dog with a fantastic pedigree for field work, some dogs just cannot make it all the way. A strong pedigree is a good indicator of the dog’s ability, but it does not always work out.

We found a dog and will be getting a male. This is the best pedigreed dog we have found and from a very good breeder. The parents and grandparents are top field dogs with all the health certificates one needs to have. We will be picking up the pup in mid-January, and that will bring us to having two Goldens! Since my wife and I are getting older, this will probably out last dog, and we will hunt with him and run them both in hunt tests.....

As for the heat, as already mentioned, Goldens are very sensitive to heat. Anything above 70 could be a risk! I keep a few small thermometers around monitoring the areas the dogs are in, e.g. under a shade tree, in a kennel, in the SUV, under a shade tarp, etc. etc. Obviously, you need to have lots of fresh water to drink and if possible, a place to get wet...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
801 Posts
But in November we decided to get one more field Golden and this time take her/him all the way to MH, if the dog is capable. Working with our trainer we can determine if the dog has the potential to be a MH. I have learned that even if you have a dog with a fantastic pedigree for field work, some dogs just cannot make it all the way. A strong pedigree is a good indicator of the dog’s ability, but it does not always work out.

We found a dog and will be getting a male. This is the best pedigreed dog we have found and from a very good breeder. The parents and grandparents are top field dogs with all the health certificates one needs to have. We will be picking up the pup in mid-January, and that will bring us to having two Goldens! Since my wife and I are getting older, this will probably out last dog, and we will hunt with him and run them both in hunt tests.....
I enjoy "hearing" the excitement in your post about getting a puppy! Indeed, it's always exciting to bring a new hopeful into the family!

FTGoldens
 

·
Jamie
Joined
·
467 Posts
Discussion Starter #32
As for the heat, as already mentioned, Goldens are very sensitive to heat. Anything above 70 could be a risk! I keep a few small thermometers around monitoring the areas the dogs are in, e.g. under a shade tree, in a kennel, in the SUV, under a shade tarp, etc. etc. Obviously, you need to have lots of fresh water to drink and if possible, a place to get wet...
I know what normal heat intolerance looks like. It was actually discovered that my dog has a mild heart murmur. So it takes him longer to recover than a dog a with perfectly healthy heart. Plus the fact that he has about 10x the amount of hair that a field dog has makes a big difference. Trust me folks, I know normal vs abnormal heat intolerance!

Congrats on the puppy, what litter are you getting one from?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Goldens are very sensitive to heat. Anything above 70 could be a risk!
This is true for field Goldens, Labs and many (most) other breeds when exerting a lot of energy in warm temps. Keep in mind summer time pond and lake water can get very warm, especial in shallow areas, and will not cool a dog very much. Dry your dog of before putting him in a crate, I have a couple chamois in my training bag. A wet dog or two in a pickup topper will generate a lot of heat.

Glad to here of some interest in field training and field Golden's. In whatever type field event you choose, always train for more than you expect to see in a test. A great many retrievers of all types are limited more by their training that by their talent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
801 Posts
This is true for field Goldens, Labs and many (most) other breeds when exerting a lot of energy in warm temps. Keep in mind summer time pond and lake water can get very warm, especial in shallow areas, and will not cool a dog very much. Dry your dog of before putting him in a crate, I have a couple chamois in my training bag. A wet dog or two in a pickup topper will generate a lot of heat.

Glad to here of some interest in field training and field Golden's. In whatever type field event you choose, always train for more than you expect to see in a test. A great many retrievers of all types are limited more by their training that by their talent.
Regarding the heat, the biggest danger that I've seen has been thick cover. In the "several" years that I've trained and field trialed retrievers, I've seen two dogs go down due to heat, both Labs ... both times it was due to hunts in relatively thick cover (one recovered, one did not).
In the spring, summer and fall, I have fans pushing air across the dogs, whether they are in the truck or the trailer ... moving air makes a difference.

As for training for more than you expect to see, I couldn't agree more!!! I'm training for the Open, but will be running Quals in the spring. :)

FTGoldens
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Regarding the heat, the biggest danger that I've seen has been thick cover. In the "several" years that I've trained and field trialed retrievers, I've seen two dogs go down due to heat, both Labs ... both times it was due to hunts in relatively thick cover (one recovered, one did not).
In the spring, summer and fall, I have fans pushing air across the dogs, whether they are in the truck or the trailer ... moving air makes a difference.

As for training for more than you expect to see, I couldn't agree more!!! I'm training for the Open, but will be running Quals in the spring. :)

FTGoldens
Good points. Have to keep in mind how fast a field of low cover can get thick with a little rain and sun in the summer.

This is a good fan; https://www.dewalt.com/products/storage-and-gear/construction-heaters/11-in-cordedcordless-jobsite-fan-tool-only/dce511b
Most other cordless tool brands make fans too.

Best of luck to you in the spring Q's.
 
21 - 36 of 36 Posts
Top