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Hello there,
My 13 week old Golden boy Rocco is a very sweet, loving pup . BUT, he also has a demonic side that is so difficult to handle. I've read many, many posts on this wonderful forum. What I've learned is, I know goldens must do their mouthing phase by way of chewing on toys, hands, and for some, their owner's feet. But, Rocco seems to be the hardest on me. He's really good with my husband and listens to him 95% of the time. My 18 year old daughter experiences some biting as well, but not to the degree that I do. He is constantly biting my feet, ankles, basically any body part he can get his teeth on. He's broke my skin several times, ripped clothing as well. I know he's not trying to hurt me, but it does hurt SO bad. I typically can't even walk through the room because he goes after me within seconds. It often turns into a situation where I am literally trying to "fight" him off of me by way of grabbing his collar, pushing him away from me, or just trying to run away. Truth be told, I am physically exhausted after these incidents. I can no longer even sit in my living room because he can now jump on the couch and once he's up there, he's "attacking" me like a shark! I've tried the time out method, I've removed myself from the room, I've tried ignoring him, I've yelped like a fellow pup, and NOTHING is working! I am at a complete loss. I love this little pup so much but I think he's shortening my life span! :) Any helpful tips are kindly appreciated!
 

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Golden puppies are land sharks! But they do grow out of this phase so take heart. First, teach him the "off" command and do not let him get on the couch. Stand up and direct him off the couch, do it over and over if you need to, and give him something else to do down on the floor, i.e., chew a bone, play tug, toss a toy to retrieve. Physically put a toy in his mouth and encourage him to play with that instead of biting you, praise him when he does. If he is really wound up and persistent with the biting, have a training session - sit, down, or whatever commands you are already working on. Give him something else to concentrate on other that biting you. Or, he may be like a toddler child and getting too wound up because he needs a nap, so maybe put him in his crate for a few minutes and see if he will settle down and sleep.

Be patient, I know it's not fun, but he will learn eventually.
 

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Golden puppies are land sharks! But they do grow out of this phase so take heart. First, teach him the "off" command and do not let him get on the couch. Stand up and direct him off the couch, do it over and over if you need to, and give him something else to do down on the floor, i.e., chew a bone, play tug, toss a toy to retrieve. Physically put a toy in his mouth and encourage him to play with that instead of biting you, praise him when he does. If he is really wound up and persistent with the biting, have a training session - sit, down, or whatever commands you are already working on. Give him something else to concentrate on other that biting you. Or, he may be like a toddler child and getting too wound up because he needs a nap, so maybe put him in his crate for a few minutes and see if he will settle down and sleep.

Be patient, I know it's not fun, but he will learn eventually.
Thank you! I know he is worth the hard work!! I really appreciate your tips :) I will definitely try to use the training session method next. He does do quite a few commands, so hopefully that will distract him when he's in land shark mode!
 

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I'm trying to remember when the land shark phase ended but I think it was somewhere between 14-16 weeks and that 11-13 weeks was when it was the worst.

Search this forum for land shark or puppy biting and you'll get a ton of threads w/ great tips. First, redirect with a behavior you do want and give him a treat. Turn it into a tiny training session of sit, down, etc. If he really needs play time, shove a toy in his face. If that all fails and he's biting you then it's time to say a firm "NO" and ignore. Get up and walk away if you have to. It may not seem to be effective at first but be patient and consistent. One day you'll start to realize that he's biting you less and less and then not at all.
 

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Thank you for your response! I will definitely search more land shark info on the forum. Lucky for him he’s so darn cute lol! He’s having the zoomies as I type this. I had to leave the room. Hopefully he will calm down soon!
 

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Rocco can drag a leash in the house so it's easier to control him, use it to enforce commands that he ignores such as "off" the couch. Stop letting him on the furniture until he's earned the privilege of being invited up. This should only be allowed when he's matured and moved out of the naughty teenager phase.

If you aren't enrolled in obedience class with Rocco, I can encourage you enough. He is giving you the worst treatment because you are the mama - I guarantee you have the softest approach with him. He's no longer a little baby and it's high time he started learning obedience and developing respect for the people in the house. That doesn't mean you have to yell at him or hit him. It just means that you need to be a bit more no-nonsense and obedience training with you in charge will be a big step toward making him a great family dog. Plan on taking classes for the next year or two, if you've never taken a class get a referral to someone who can give you a few private lessons to get you started and you will feel more confident. This is about developing the relationship with him where you are the leader and he is the follower. The older he gets the sassier he will feel and you need to get on this now.

Structure is important in getting through this phase as well. Start anticipating the times of day when he is worst and crate him with a good chew bone or an antler or bully stick or frozen kong. Put a crate in the kitchen or family room so he is with the family but not given the run of the house. Make she he is getting adequate nap time but be sure he is also getting increased aerobic exercise as well. He needs a minimum of 20-30 minutes every day of exercise that leaves him tired and panting. A few minutes of tug in the living room will not do it and neither will a leash walk around the block. He needs to be retrieving, running, swimming, chasing a soccer ball or off leash hiking or playing games like hide and seek, learning new things etc. He's not a little baby anymore and his exercise and need for more mental work are also expanding. It's a huge part of making him a good family dog to ensure he's getting all he needs.

We have some recent threads on this subject if you look through them - take a look at the ones saying "aggressive puppy" or talking about out of control older puppies. There is a lot of advice and good ideas in them. I suggest kikopup on youtube they have a ton of puppy training videos and you can start teaching him "attention" and "leave it" for puppies while you get set up. Buy the Jackie Mertens DVD Sound Beginnings and start teaching him a formal retrieve. This is the best way to get a Golden proper exercise, using the retrieving instinct to your advantage. Best of luck!!!
 

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I'm trying to remember when the land shark phase ended but I think it was somewhere between 14-16 weeks and that 11-13 weeks was when it was the worst.

Search this forum for land shark or puppy biting and you'll get a ton of threads w/ great tips. First, redirect with a behavior you do want and give him a treat. Turn it into a tiny training session of sit, down, etc. If he really needs play time, shove a toy in his face. If that all fails and he's biting you then it's time to say a firm "NO" and ignore. Get up and walk away if you have to. It may not seem to be effective at first but be patient and consistent. One day you'll start to realize that he's biting you less and less and then not at all.
Rocco can drag a leash in the house so it's easier to control him, use it to enforce commands that he ignores such as "off" the couch. Stop letting him on the furniture until he's earned the privilege of being invited up. This should only be allowed when he's matured and moved out of the naughty teenager phase.

If you aren't enrolled in obedience class with Rocco, I can encourage you enough. He is giving you the worst treatment because you are the mama - I guarantee you have the softest approach with him. He's no longer a little baby and it's high time he started learning obedience and developing respect for the people in the house. That doesn't mean you have to yell at him or hit him. It just means that you need to be a bit more no-nonsense and obedience training with you in charge will be a big step toward making him a great family dog. Plan on taking classes for the next year or two, if you've never taken a class get a referral to someone who can give you a few private lessons to get you started and you will feel more confident. This is about developing the relationship with him where you are the leader and he is the follower. The older he gets the sassier he will feel and you need to get on this now.

Structure is important in getting through this phase as well. Start anticipating the times of day when he is worst and crate him with a good chew bone or an antler or bully stick or frozen kong. Put a crate in the kitchen or family room so he is with the family but not given the run of the house. Make she he is getting adequate nap time but be sure he is also getting increased aerobic exercise as well. He needs a minimum of 20-30 minutes every day of exercise that leaves him tired and panting. A few minutes of tug in the living room will not do it and neither will a leash walk around the block. He needs to be retrieving, running, swimming, chasing a soccer ball or off leash hiking or playing games like hide and seek, learning new things etc. He's not a little baby anymore and his exercise and need for more mental work are also expanding. It's a huge part of making him a good family dog to ensure he's getting all he needs.

We have some recent threads on this subject if you look through them - take a look at the ones saying "aggressive puppy" or talking about out of control older puppies. There is a lot of advice and good ideas in them. I suggest kikopup on youtube they have a ton of puppy training videos and you can start teaching him "attention" and "leave it" for puppies while you get set up. Buy the Jackie Mertens DVD Sound Beginnings and start teaching him a formal retrieve. This is the best way to get a Golden proper exercise, using the retrieving instinct to your advantage. Best of luck!!!
Wow! Thank you so much for all of this information! I think I will definitely try the leash idea first! He does seem a little bit more calm when he has his leash on. I know I need to get control over this pup. I will keep on keeping on until this stage has passed. I will definitely keep researching and watching training videos. Thanks for the suggestion on the Jackie Mertens DVD. I've never heard of that one. :)
 

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So we have a 12 week old puppy Cleo and she was doing really good about not biting and now she has 2 back molars coming in and it seems we've gone a bit backwards. Here's what we do:
Get some treats, tell the pup to sit or laydown- whatever commands the pup knows - pup probably needs some sort of mental stimulation at this point outside of zoomies.

A kong is a great idea for teething, there are tons of recipes and freezing one makes it last longer - Cleo always tries out after this.

Teach what is okay to chew on. Replace your hand with a toy, replace a short with a toy. Toys toys toys, they are your arsenal. Have them on hand!

If all else fails we put her in her pen with a puzzle toy - we have 2 puzzles that we found on amazon. They are great for mental stimulation!! She has to move pieces and find the treats.

Typically when Cleo is super bitey she is either really overtired and just needs to stop throwing her toddler tantrum and take a nap already, or she needs some sort of mental stimulation. I will include photos of our puzzle toys and I highly recommend treat dispensing toys as well.

Two nights ago I swear she was a little demon and I didn't understand where my sweet puppy went until I realized she had been up for 6 and a half hours without a nap. I had to let her screech in her crate for a bit (SO hard to do) before she finally konked out.

Your pup is teething and this will pass!

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Give some thought to why the puppy is biting you more than other family members. Puppies do what is reinforcing to them. Your attention - even it's to pull on his collar, push him away, or run (Whoo hoo! time to chase the momma!), may be inadvertently reinforcing his behavior towards you.

You may also want to reconsider how much freedom you are giving him. My puppies have mostly been in some sort of confinement (crate, ex-pen, behind a baby gate, tethered, etc.) any time I wasn't actively interacting with them, and certainly until they were "reliable" in the house (re housebreaking and chewing on things). They were usually in the same room with us, they were just expected to sleep or entertain themselves when we weren't interacting with them. He can't bite you if he can't get to you! If he's enjoying some free time and he gets bitey... then back into confinement he goes...
 
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