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Our 12 week old girl is crate trained for nights and when we need to be away from home with no problems. We take her outside 1 last time at night before putting her to bed in her crate. She often will fall asleep in her favorite quiet spot which is in the spare bathroom between the wall and the toilet. She doesn't nap in her crate or in the open, she naps in this spot or under a bench in the entry. Much as I would love her to lie by us, she doesn't. At night if we have to get her out of one of these spots to take her outside before bedtime, she has started to growl and nip. This also happened at the vet office when she fell asleep under a chair. The vet witnessed it and we confirmed there is nothing physically wrong with her. If it continues we are going to discuss at our next visit but in the meantime, any ideas? Tonight we are going to put her in the crate if we see her head for a nap.
 

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Change your tactics. Don't try to pick her up, call her and get her to wake up and get up and come to you, then try to pick her up. You need to start this now anyway, because before very long she will be too big to pick up and need her to learn to come when called.

Never punish a growl, it is communication the only way they can let you know they are not comfortable with whatever is happening.
 

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Change your tactics. Don't try to pick her up, call her and get her to wake up and get up and come to you, then try to pick her up. You need to start this now anyway, because before very long she will be too big to pick up and need her to learn to come when called.

Never punish a growl, it is communication the only way they can let you know they are not comfortable with whatever is happening.
I agree with Mylissyk. We had this same problem with Mia around 10 weeks old. I think she just wasn't comfortable getting picked up out of a deep sleep, maybe even a little scared. After reading other posts on this topic, we decided to wake her gently and then get her to come to her crate using treats when necessary. She hasn't growled since.
 

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Kristy
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"Let sleeping dogs lie." You remember this one, right? Be sure that any visitors or especially children in your house know not to mess with her when she's sleeping.

Not sure from your description if this is happening because she is startled awake and it's a startle reflex or if she's being a stinker. Either way, start thinking about how you approach her when this has happened. Were you patient or were you rushing her? When puppies are little, you can usually scoop them up from sleep and they won't even notice.
Same with babies. But then they start getting bigger and more independent and that no longer works for children or for puppies.

How would feel if you're sleeping in the coziest spot on the couch and someone abruptly comes in and pokes you on the shoulder and then takes hold of your arm and tries to make you sit up, tells you to go the bathroom and get in your bed. You'd probably be pretty grouchy. Your puppy is searching out the spot behind the toilet because it's the coolest spot. She's comfy there. Start being sure that you give her plenty of notice that you're looking for her, call her name, clap your hands and sound cheerful. If you aren't using treats as a reward or to tempt/lure her out of her cozy spot, I certainly would do that to work through this. If my puppy were doing this, I'd be working on gently waking her up from naps with a treat in my hand and putting it under her nose to wake her and using this to make it positive. Slow down and treat her gently, remember she's a living creature with feelings and stop putting your hands on her to move her.

If you all are not enrolled in puppy classes yet, I would waste no time in getting signed up. If she is a stinker, it's going to be especially important that you all establish a solid obedience foundation with you as the team leader. I would also not be letting this puppy up on furniture to sleep and claim her "spot" on the couch, bed etc. until she is older and your relationship has been established and she is clear that you are the person and she is the dog. Otherwise it sounds like she may be at higher risk to be a dog who could push the envelope with this. Having daily on leash obedience sessions is important for all Goldens but especially for those who have strong opinions early on.
 

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I think you've gotten some great advice here. I agree with everything else that has been written. I also think nolefan's point about training is spot on.

I haven't experienced this personally, but my dog is timid and I've absolutely massively startled her out of sleep before. Her whole body jumps, just like I would, and I feel awful. So I usually try to wake her up by talking gently to her.

My childhood dog's favorite spot was between the toilet and the wall. So was my best friends. Its quiet and cool and protected. When Piper was a puppy she liked to sleep on the tile floor of my kitchen. I used to think she didn't like me. But I think a lot of it is their puppy coat and metabolism, and adult undercoat actually helps dogs stay cool when they are warm. She grew into a snuggly velcro dog with a complete lack of respect for personal space :)
 
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