Thinking about getting a puppy, getting a bit scared from reading here - Page 3 - Golden Retrievers : Golden Retriever Dog Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #21 of 25 (permalink) Old 09-17-2019, 08:09 AM Thread Starter
New Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 12
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 11 Times in 2 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lori Dwyer View Post
I would love to visit Norway! The members who
commented so far have much greater knowledge about Goldenís than I have and have posted excellent advice! Iím a newby first time golden owner of a 6 month old pup. Weíve had him since June. From reading your last post it seems like putting in the work isnít a problem. I have never raised or house broke a puppy before Aidan. I was mostly concerned about having the problems such as: will he keep me up all night? How difficult will potty training be? How hard is it to train a golden. I was never concerned about aggression as Goldenís are known to be sweet dogs. He has brought so much happiness and smiles to our days. There are many website articles about what to look for when selecting a puppy that pertain to certain behavior and physical traits. I really almost didnít get Aidan but am now so happy I went through wit it! If you do decide to get the puppy, it will be easier with Buddy there to help! It looks like you have some time to think about it. Let us know when you decide.
Itís really good to hear from someone that has been in the same position as us not long ago! And good to hear that youíre happy you went through with it!

How did it go with the things you worried about? Did he keep you up all night, how difficult was the potty training and other training and so on? How was everything compared to what you thought beforehand?
Nordvest is offline  
post #22 of 25 (permalink) Old 09-17-2019, 11:11 AM
Esquire Golden Retrievers
 
DanaRuns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Southern California
Posts: 3,898
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Quoted: 315 Post(s)
Thanks: 3,278
Thanked 8,519 Times in 2,552 Posts
Hi Nordvest.

I'm a breeder of Goldens, and have had Goldens my entire life. I've had all mixes of numbers, ages, situations, etc. So I'll give you my observations. Take them for what you will.

Most of the "horror stories" here come from two categories: (1) people who bought poorly bred puppies with serious temperament/health issues; and (2) inexperienced buyers who had the wrong vision of what a puppy would be like and who lack the skills and mindset to deal with it.

It's pretty rare that a well bred Golden pup will have terrible temperament issue. After all, the whole reputation of the affable Golden Retriever is earned through experiences with countless animals over a hundred years. But every once in a while, quite rarely actually, a pup will be born that just has inherent psychological problems that can't be resolved. The vast, vast majority of "bad temperaments" in Goldens are human created. They are caused by neglectful breeders and owners who don't know how to raise puppies. These inherently bad-tempered dogs are extremely rare, though, in any decently bred Golden. By far, the vast majority of nightmare dogs are caused by the owner's ignorance, lack of care, or actual bad actions. We make our dogs what they are.

And the vast majority is of nightmare posts here, by people at their wits' end in tears because they just can't deal with this out of control puppy, are simply people who didn't know what a puppy was really like, thought they would be "plug and play" cute little obedient pets right out of the box, and have no skills or instinct on how to guide a puppy into living in a human world. It's usually a problem of expectations. They didn't expect this out of their puppy, and they have no idea how to interact with the puppy in a healthy, guiding way.

One thing all puppy buyers would do well to make their mantra is, "The difference between an ordeal and an adventure is ATTITUDE."

Puppies are an adventure. Or an ordeal. All depends on how you look at it.

Golden Retriever puppies are extremely mouthy, enthusiastic, and they have sharp little needle teeth. To the uninitiated and unskilled, this is like inviting a piranha into your home. It's important to realize that puppies have instincts and social inclinations that don't fit automatically in a human home. They have to learn how to behave. And since they don't speak our languages and don't have our cognitive ability, we have to find ways to communicate proper and improper conduct, and motivate them to engage in the former, not the latter. It's amazing how often it seems as if puppies are smarter than humans. I occasionally have to remind puppy buyers that they are the ones with the big brains, and that they truly are smarter than their puppy.

The solution to 99% of the nightmare puppy posts here is to buy a decently bred puppy, learn how to communicate with and train puppies, and don't expect this infant of another species to instantly and seamlessly mesh with a human household. I can't count the number of posts here from people freaking out who actually have a perfectly fine and normal puppy, and who mistakenly think they have a demon on their hands when the problem is their own expectations and ignorance.

It's not a lottery, not a crap shoot. It's a puppy, and you're a person, and you need to set your fantasies aside, get realistic expectations, and LEARN how to guide an infant puppy into being a great family member.

That said, occasionally puppies can be really challenging, just like human children. Understand that, and deal with it. I had a puppy who was an absolute dream. Just the perfect, easy puppy. The next one was just the opposite. Incredibly challenging and seemingly immune to all my skills. But even that puppy became a great dog. Appropriate expectations + knowledge + time = fantastic dog. The only variable is the amount of time it might take.

And I'm not too concerned about your senior Golden. Just monitor. Some older dogs are kind of grumpy and don't like puppies, while others absolutely love them. And very often a new puppy in the house will make the old dog jealous and cantankerous, until he learns that the puppy is his companion and not his competition. Just take it slow and it will probably be fine.
DanaRuns is offline  
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to DanaRuns For This Useful Post:
ceegee (09-17-2019), DblTrblGolden2 (09-17-2019), Nordvest (09-17-2019)
post #23 of 25 (permalink) Old 09-17-2019, 11:46 AM Thread Starter
New Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 12
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Thanks: 14
Thanked 11 Times in 2 Posts
Thanks, that's really helpful!

I don't think our expectations are too unrealistic, we know it's a lot of work involved. We do however have no experience at all with puppies and understand that puppies are a whole other ball game than getting a well behaved senior like we did. He didn't need us to show him how to be a good dog, he had that under complete control long before he met us. And he was extremely easy to read/understand for us. I imagine a puppy being a lot more chaotic in every way...


At the end, regarding Buddy and the puppy you wrote: "Just take it slow and it will probably be fine". How do we "take it slow" in this regard?
Nordvest is offline  
post #24 of 25 (permalink) Old 09-17-2019, 12:59 PM
Senior Member
 
cwag's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Virginia
Posts: 3,440
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Quoted: 427 Post(s)
Thanks: 4,598
Thanked 2,903 Times in 1,606 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanaRuns View Post
Hi Nordvest.
Most of the "horror stories" here come from two categories: (1) people who bought poorly bred puppies with serious temperament/health issues; and (2) inexperienced buyers who had the wrong vision of what a puppy would be like and who lack the skills and mindset to deal with it.

And the vast majority is of nightmare posts here, by people at their wits' end in tears because they just can't deal with this out of control puppy, are simply people who didn't know what a puppy was really like, thought they would be "plug and play" cute little obedient pets right out of the box, and have no skills or instinct on how to guide a puppy into living in a human world. It's usually a problem of expectations. They didn't expect this out of their puppy, and they have no idea how to interact with the puppy in a healthy, guiding way.

One thing all puppy buyers would do well to make their mantra is, "The difference between an ordeal and an adventure is ATTITUDE."

Golden Retriever puppies are extremely mouthy, enthusiastic, and they have sharp little needle teeth. To the uninitiated and unskilled, this is like inviting a piranha into your home. It's important to realize that puppies have instincts and social inclinations that don't fit automatically in a human home. They have to learn how to behave. And since they don't speak our languages and don't have our cognitive ability, we have to find ways to communicate proper and improper conduct, and motivate them to engage in the former, not the latter. It's amazing how often it seems as if puppies are smarter than humans. I occasionally have to remind puppy buyers that they are the ones with the big brains, and that they truly are smarter than their puppy.

I can't count the number of posts here from people freaking out who actually have a perfectly fine and normal puppy, and who mistakenly think they have a demon on their hands when the problem is their own expectations and ignorance.

And I'm not too concerned about your senior Golden. Just monitor. Some older dogs are kind of grumpy and don't like puppies, while others absolutely love them. And very often a new puppy in the house will make the old dog jealous and cantankerous, until he learns that the puppy is his companion and not his competition. Just take it slow and it will probably be fine.
I agree. I sort of laugh to myself at the number of new puppy posts on day one or two of bringing the puppy home that say, my puppy is so sweet, good, and practically house trained and then the number of post when they are around 4 months old saying I have a not normal "aggressive puppy." I jokingly told my neighbor about this when they got their Golden puppy and she later told me she felt exactly both of those ways and was glad to know ahead of time her "aggressive puppy" was a normal Golden Retriever.

Also we had an almost 11 year old Bichon who didn't really like other dogs (she was mostly just scared of them) when we got Rukie and she loved him right away. It made her start acting like she did when she was 5 years younger. She started playing more, lost a little weight, ate her food up quicker and was generally a much happier little dog.


Lyric Last Jedi - Call name Rukie Bear 05/2017
Eva Bear (Bichon) 09/2005 to 11/2018
Tawny Bear 01/2000 to 10/2012
Honeybear 01/1987 to 07/1999
cwag is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to cwag For This Useful Post:
DblTrblGolden2 (09-17-2019)
post #25 of 25 (permalink) Old 09-17-2019, 02:02 PM
Member
 
DblTrblGolden2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Delaware
Posts: 391
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Quoted: 69 Post(s)
Thanks: 450
Thanked 420 Times in 173 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nordvest View Post
Hi,

Still, does it happen that things go fairly well, that itís nice to get a puppy (all in all) and not an exhausting torment? And how often does that happen compared to ďhelp, this is terrible!Ē (if you know what I mean)
I haven't commented on this post. I too read many of the "aggressive puppy posts" and either roll my eyes or laugh depending on the day. I've owned many Golden's over the years, trained to various degrees. I have loved every single one, although I can say that my relationship with each one has been different. Currently I have Duke, he's just the light of everyday. I also have Moe, he's the light of my husbands day. I also love Moe, he's my laughter during the day and Duke is sort of my steadfast companion. I can honestly tell you that everyone has a day here and there that they question their sanity when raising and training a Golden puppy. The difference for me is that I enjoy EVERYDAY of it. If something is wrong in the training process I analyze WHAT I'M DOING WRONG. It's not the puppies fault to me, it's my responsibility to teach it what I expect. In my opinion you get out of owning a Golden what you are willing to put into it.

Yesterday I had a person come to the house and both dogs were running in the yard. They came and sat at each side of me and waited for me to open the gate to the fence and let them in. They know to come to me and sit if a car is in the driveway. They also know that they go in the fence while the person is there, unless it's someone that I know enjoys them. The women commented on how well they were behaved and I just said thanks. She went on to tell me how horrible labs are. My son has labs and I help with their basic training as well. Everything she said the labs do a Golden will do too. It's all about the time your willing to spend training them. Now, I'm not a lab person, but that's a whole different conversation. She also commented on how nice it is when they get "old enough to behave", Moe is 17 months old. Duke is older and white faced so I think she just assumed they were both older.

There are a few times in life that I don't think even the best of us should get a puppy. My number one time is when you have a new baby, or are planning on having one. It can just be overwhelming and normally in my opinion it will be the puppy training that suffers. That being said, I did that too. I made it through it, but it wasn't my best moment and I was definitely exhausted.

If you get a Golden puppy your life will change. You will loose some sleep. It will interrupt your favorite TV show 4 times to be walked and then not pee when you take it out. It will annoy you, but you will laugh over it (I hope). Moe had a thing for biting the toe part of my flip flops off. Not in a long drawn out fashion, just one quick bite and they were trash. I looked at it like it was my fault for leaving them by the door and started working on "leave it" immediately. Crate training will be your new hobby. You will spend more hours wandering aimlessly around your yard then you ever have before, and you will fall helplessly in love with your new addition if you do everything right.

Read the horror stories on here and then think about how you would train to correct the behavior. Read the answers the knowledgeable people on here leave and bank that information away for when it applies to you. There is nothing better then owning a Golden if you go into it with your eyes open. Make sure you have the 4 core clearances. I would suggest posting the registered names on here and letting the experts provide some advice on litter selection. I've been doing this a while and still feel there insight is invaluable. Don't get in a hurry!! Be certain you are willing to take on the financial obligation of raising a healthy puppy too. Duke never had an unexpected vet visit until he was over 7 years, Moe I choose not to keep track of what I've spent on.

If your on here doing the research ahead of time you will probably be fine. It's the people that see me out with my dogs and assume that Golden's just naturally behave that way from birth that end up in trouble. Also know that Duke is like old reliable, professionally field trained, etc.... Today I had a Heating and AC crew working at my house and he decided to jump the fence to investigate what they were doing. I was outside and it wasn't a big deal, other then he knows better, but no matter how well trained, or how old they will keep you on your toes. I actually secretly enjoyed the idea that he could still pull it off.
DblTrblGolden2 is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to DblTrblGolden2 For This Useful Post:
Nordvest (09-19-2019)
Reply

Bookmarks

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Golden Retrievers : Golden Retriever Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome