Feeding my 3-month old golden retriever puppy - Golden Retrievers : Golden Retriever Dog Forums
 
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post #1 of 6 (permalink) Old 04-20-2017, 07:17 AM Thread Starter
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Feeding my 3-month old golden retriever puppy

When i got her at 2months and 2weeks, she doesn't really finish her meals so I did some mixing some liver/chicken breast/yoghurt when she doesn't eat much. Now she's 3 months and I'm feeding her twice a day, I was feeding her twice a day 1/2 cup per meal(I didn't read and realize that it's not enough) but she can barely finish it unless I mix something. Now I read today that I need to feed her 2cups a day but she doesn't really finish 1/2 cup if i don't add anything. I am trying the 30mins method that whether she finish it or not, I'll remove her food but I don't think it's working. I tried beef pro puppy, pedigree puppy, and now I'm trying to stick with holistic puppy because I read alot and holistic is the only one that is good and fits my budget. What should I do? This is my first time having my own puppy btw
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post #2 of 6 (permalink) Old 04-20-2017, 07:46 AM
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Hi and welcome to the forum.
I'll move this thread to the puppy section for you, where I think you'll get more responses.
I can't really help you with your puppy, as I've never had a dog who wouldn't eat. Perhaps some of the other members will, when they wake up. (Most of the members are from the US.) It might help if we know where you are from. Good luck with him!
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post #3 of 6 (permalink) Old 04-20-2017, 08:04 AM
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Welcome to the forum, what's your puppy's name?

Have you been going to the vet or checking her weight regularly? If she is healthy in other regards and the vet is happy with her body condition, I would try not to worry about her being a picky eater. If you have not had her for a vet check recently, I would call and ask if you could bring her in for a weight check. Any good vet will let you come do that pretty much any time. My vet has always emphasized to me that dogs are like people in the respect that they are better off being a little too lean than a little too heavy.

Following the directions on the package of dog food will have you over feeding her. The best way is to pay attention to her body condition and bump her amount of food up or down depending on how much exercise she's getting and how she is looking. She will go through little growth spurts where she is hungrier and then have phases where she isn't growing as fast. Just pay attention.

She really should be finishing her kibble at every meal and when she doesn't it's a sign that she may not be feeling well (then you think about how much she's drinking, how are her potty habits, firm stool etc. and is she still playing and acting energetic.) or it's a sign she is being over fed. Something else to consider is how much training are you doing with her? Is she getting a lot of training treats? That is something else to take into consideration.

Here is some reading for you:
From a respected site on health:
"Most importantly, I recommend you feed your puppy the amount of food required to keep him lean, which is about a 2 out of 5 or a 4 out of 9 body condition score." Here is the link to the article: Do You Know What to Feed Your Large or Giant Breed Puppy?

Feeding Large Breed Puppies - IVC Journal

Here is information on how important it is that she grow slowly:

Slow Grow

Here is an article that hopefully will help you not worry as much about her being lean as long as the vet says she's healthy:

Add Years To Your Dog's Life | Prevention


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Ellie

Mack the collie boy


http://www.k9data.com/pedigree.asp?ID=536873
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post #4 of 6 (permalink) Old 04-20-2017, 10:04 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilgrim123 View Post
Hi and welcome to the forum.
I'll move this thread to the puppy section for you, where I think you'll get more responses.
I can't really help you with your puppy, as I've never had a dog who wouldn't eat. Perhaps some of the other members will, when they wake up. (Most of the members are from the US.) It might help if we know where you are from. Good luck with him!
I'm from Philippines. Thanks alot
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post #5 of 6 (permalink) Old 04-20-2017, 10:07 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by nolefan View Post
Welcome to the forum, what's your puppy's name?

Have you been going to the vet or checking her weight regularly? If she is healthy in other regards and the vet is happy with her body condition, I would try not to worry about her being a picky eater. If you have not had her for a vet check recently, I would call and ask if you could bring her in for a weight check. Any good vet will let you come do that pretty much any time. My vet has always emphasized to me that dogs are like people in the respect that they are better off being a little too lean than a little too heavy.

Following the directions on the package of dog food will have you over feeding her. The best way is to pay attention to her body condition and bump her amount of food up or down depending on how much exercise she's getting and how she is looking. She will go through little growth spurts where she is hungrier and then have phases where she isn't growing as fast. Just pay attention.

She really should be finishing her kibble at every meal and when she doesn't it's a sign that she may not be feeling well (then you think about how much she's drinking, how are her potty habits, firm stool etc. and is she still playing and acting energetic.) or it's a sign she is being over fed. Something else to consider is how much training are you doing with her? Is she getting a lot of training treats? That is something else to take into consideration.

Here is some reading for you:
From a respected site on health:
"Most importantly, I recommend you feed your puppy the amount of food required to keep him lean, which is about a 2 out of 5 or a 4 out of 9 body condition score." Here is the link to the article: Do You Know What to Feed Your Large or Giant Breed Puppy?

Feeding Large Breed Puppies - IVC Journal

Here is information on how important it is that she grow slowly:

Slow Grow

Here is an article that hopefully will help you not worry as much about her being lean as long as the vet says she's healthy:

Add Years To Your Dog's Life | Prevention
Her name is Sophie. Her vet said it's normal, she's not thin and she's not that fat. I'll try to read the links you gave me when I got home. I stopped training her for like 3 weeks already but I was giving her chicken breast for treats before. Should I just keep training her everyday for the basic commands? How long should it be? 3-5mins per session? Thanks in advance
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post #6 of 6 (permalink) Old 04-20-2017, 01:17 PM
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If your vet is happy with her weight, try not to worry. Yes, yes, yes - keep training her every day. 5 minute sessions a few times a day are better than just one longer session. You can increase length a little as she gets older. Keep working on the things she knows so she doesn't forget them. Use them to let her "earn" her dinner and to be a good family member, remember her manners. Be sure to keep teaching her new things to keep it interesting for her and make lessons fun. Reward her with play (tug on a toy) as well as treats. Teach her to release the toy from her mouth when you give a command. You could keep a special, favorite toy for her that only comes out when you are working on training. The more time you spend working with her for the next two years or so, the more you will be rewarded with a really great dog who is a joy to live with. Don't forget that as she gets older she will begin to need exercise to keep her healthy, swimming or retrieving that gets her heart rate up and leaves her tired and panting. A tired dog is a good dog


SHR Richwood Work Hard Play Harder CD WC
Ellie

Mack the collie boy


http://www.k9data.com/pedigree.asp?ID=536873
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